'Anamorphic Carcasses: Memorials of Waste' - decompositional architecture by Daniel Caven (SClarc post graduate ESTM program)
This speculative project envisages architectural artefacts that use, as a medium, the polluted aquifers that line the Mojave desert. Native species and ecosystems are being affected by human industrialisation in the area; damaged by pollution. These structures would be made up of operable holding tanks and water purifying scaffolding that would intentionally excrete waste as they function; leading to decomposition of the outer shell to eventually produce strange skeletal forms. These resulting grotesques (or carcasses) would stand as ‘memorials of waste’ - illustrating the effects of pollutants in the aquatic ecology of the Mojave desert. 
While it seems unlikely something like this would ever go beyond a conceptual stage, as statements of architecture-meets-art they would certainly be fascinating creations to watch as they transform themselves. 
See more at: eVolo
Zoom Info
'Anamorphic Carcasses: Memorials of Waste' - decompositional architecture by Daniel Caven (SClarc post graduate ESTM program)
This speculative project envisages architectural artefacts that use, as a medium, the polluted aquifers that line the Mojave desert. Native species and ecosystems are being affected by human industrialisation in the area; damaged by pollution. These structures would be made up of operable holding tanks and water purifying scaffolding that would intentionally excrete waste as they function; leading to decomposition of the outer shell to eventually produce strange skeletal forms. These resulting grotesques (or carcasses) would stand as ‘memorials of waste’ - illustrating the effects of pollutants in the aquatic ecology of the Mojave desert. 
While it seems unlikely something like this would ever go beyond a conceptual stage, as statements of architecture-meets-art they would certainly be fascinating creations to watch as they transform themselves. 
See more at: eVolo
Zoom Info
'Anamorphic Carcasses: Memorials of Waste' - decompositional architecture by Daniel Caven (SClarc post graduate ESTM program)
This speculative project envisages architectural artefacts that use, as a medium, the polluted aquifers that line the Mojave desert. Native species and ecosystems are being affected by human industrialisation in the area; damaged by pollution. These structures would be made up of operable holding tanks and water purifying scaffolding that would intentionally excrete waste as they function; leading to decomposition of the outer shell to eventually produce strange skeletal forms. These resulting grotesques (or carcasses) would stand as ‘memorials of waste’ - illustrating the effects of pollutants in the aquatic ecology of the Mojave desert. 
While it seems unlikely something like this would ever go beyond a conceptual stage, as statements of architecture-meets-art they would certainly be fascinating creations to watch as they transform themselves. 
See more at: eVolo
Zoom Info
'Anamorphic Carcasses: Memorials of Waste' - decompositional architecture by Daniel Caven (SClarc post graduate ESTM program)
This speculative project envisages architectural artefacts that use, as a medium, the polluted aquifers that line the Mojave desert. Native species and ecosystems are being affected by human industrialisation in the area; damaged by pollution. These structures would be made up of operable holding tanks and water purifying scaffolding that would intentionally excrete waste as they function; leading to decomposition of the outer shell to eventually produce strange skeletal forms. These resulting grotesques (or carcasses) would stand as ‘memorials of waste’ - illustrating the effects of pollutants in the aquatic ecology of the Mojave desert. 
While it seems unlikely something like this would ever go beyond a conceptual stage, as statements of architecture-meets-art they would certainly be fascinating creations to watch as they transform themselves. 
See more at: eVolo
Zoom Info
'Anamorphic Carcasses: Memorials of Waste' - decompositional architecture by Daniel Caven (SClarc post graduate ESTM program)
This speculative project envisages architectural artefacts that use, as a medium, the polluted aquifers that line the Mojave desert. Native species and ecosystems are being affected by human industrialisation in the area; damaged by pollution. These structures would be made up of operable holding tanks and water purifying scaffolding that would intentionally excrete waste as they function; leading to decomposition of the outer shell to eventually produce strange skeletal forms. These resulting grotesques (or carcasses) would stand as ‘memorials of waste’ - illustrating the effects of pollutants in the aquatic ecology of the Mojave desert. 
While it seems unlikely something like this would ever go beyond a conceptual stage, as statements of architecture-meets-art they would certainly be fascinating creations to watch as they transform themselves. 
See more at: eVolo
Zoom Info
'Anamorphic Carcasses: Memorials of Waste' - decompositional architecture by Daniel Caven (SClarc post graduate ESTM program)
This speculative project envisages architectural artefacts that use, as a medium, the polluted aquifers that line the Mojave desert. Native species and ecosystems are being affected by human industrialisation in the area; damaged by pollution. These structures would be made up of operable holding tanks and water purifying scaffolding that would intentionally excrete waste as they function; leading to decomposition of the outer shell to eventually produce strange skeletal forms. These resulting grotesques (or carcasses) would stand as ‘memorials of waste’ - illustrating the effects of pollutants in the aquatic ecology of the Mojave desert. 
While it seems unlikely something like this would ever go beyond a conceptual stage, as statements of architecture-meets-art they would certainly be fascinating creations to watch as they transform themselves. 
See more at: eVolo
Zoom Info
'Anamorphic Carcasses: Memorials of Waste' - decompositional architecture by Daniel Caven (SClarc post graduate ESTM program)
This speculative project envisages architectural artefacts that use, as a medium, the polluted aquifers that line the Mojave desert. Native species and ecosystems are being affected by human industrialisation in the area; damaged by pollution. These structures would be made up of operable holding tanks and water purifying scaffolding that would intentionally excrete waste as they function; leading to decomposition of the outer shell to eventually produce strange skeletal forms. These resulting grotesques (or carcasses) would stand as ‘memorials of waste’ - illustrating the effects of pollutants in the aquatic ecology of the Mojave desert. 
While it seems unlikely something like this would ever go beyond a conceptual stage, as statements of architecture-meets-art they would certainly be fascinating creations to watch as they transform themselves. 
See more at: eVolo
Zoom Info
'Anamorphic Carcasses: Memorials of Waste' - decompositional architecture by Daniel Caven (SClarc post graduate ESTM program)
This speculative project envisages architectural artefacts that use, as a medium, the polluted aquifers that line the Mojave desert. Native species and ecosystems are being affected by human industrialisation in the area; damaged by pollution. These structures would be made up of operable holding tanks and water purifying scaffolding that would intentionally excrete waste as they function; leading to decomposition of the outer shell to eventually produce strange skeletal forms. These resulting grotesques (or carcasses) would stand as ‘memorials of waste’ - illustrating the effects of pollutants in the aquatic ecology of the Mojave desert. 
While it seems unlikely something like this would ever go beyond a conceptual stage, as statements of architecture-meets-art they would certainly be fascinating creations to watch as they transform themselves. 
See more at: eVolo
Zoom Info
'Anamorphic Carcasses: Memorials of Waste' - decompositional architecture by Daniel Caven (SClarc post graduate ESTM program)
This speculative project envisages architectural artefacts that use, as a medium, the polluted aquifers that line the Mojave desert. Native species and ecosystems are being affected by human industrialisation in the area; damaged by pollution. These structures would be made up of operable holding tanks and water purifying scaffolding that would intentionally excrete waste as they function; leading to decomposition of the outer shell to eventually produce strange skeletal forms. These resulting grotesques (or carcasses) would stand as ‘memorials of waste’ - illustrating the effects of pollutants in the aquatic ecology of the Mojave desert. 
While it seems unlikely something like this would ever go beyond a conceptual stage, as statements of architecture-meets-art they would certainly be fascinating creations to watch as they transform themselves. 
See more at: eVolo
Zoom Info

'Anamorphic Carcasses: Memorials of Waste' - decompositional architecture by Daniel Caven (SClarc post graduate ESTM program)

This speculative project envisages architectural artefacts that use, as a medium, the polluted aquifers that line the Mojave desert. Native species and ecosystems are being affected by human industrialisation in the area; damaged by pollution. These structures would be made up of operable holding tanks and water purifying scaffolding that would intentionally excrete waste as they function; leading to decomposition of the outer shell to eventually produce strange skeletal forms. These resulting grotesques (or carcasses) would stand as ‘memorials of waste’ - illustrating the effects of pollutants in the aquatic ecology of the Mojave desert. 

While it seems unlikely something like this would ever go beyond a conceptual stage, as statements of architecture-meets-art they would certainly be fascinating creations to watch as they transform themselves. 

See more at: eVolo

Babilus Vases - Nir Meiri
These vase designs reference ancient architecture such as temples and altars by clustering together at differing heights to resemble a series of classical buildings. Forged from bamboo, strand board, glass and corian, they come in a range of sizes to house plants of various types. 
The pieces stack together to create the body, while a glass vessel sits within to hold the plant itself. The collection has been presented during the London Design Festival 2014 at the 19 Greek Street gallery. 
See more at: DesignBoom
Zoom Info
Babilus Vases - Nir Meiri
These vase designs reference ancient architecture such as temples and altars by clustering together at differing heights to resemble a series of classical buildings. Forged from bamboo, strand board, glass and corian, they come in a range of sizes to house plants of various types. 
The pieces stack together to create the body, while a glass vessel sits within to hold the plant itself. The collection has been presented during the London Design Festival 2014 at the 19 Greek Street gallery. 
See more at: DesignBoom
Zoom Info
Babilus Vases - Nir Meiri
These vase designs reference ancient architecture such as temples and altars by clustering together at differing heights to resemble a series of classical buildings. Forged from bamboo, strand board, glass and corian, they come in a range of sizes to house plants of various types. 
The pieces stack together to create the body, while a glass vessel sits within to hold the plant itself. The collection has been presented during the London Design Festival 2014 at the 19 Greek Street gallery. 
See more at: DesignBoom
Zoom Info
Babilus Vases - Nir Meiri
These vase designs reference ancient architecture such as temples and altars by clustering together at differing heights to resemble a series of classical buildings. Forged from bamboo, strand board, glass and corian, they come in a range of sizes to house plants of various types. 
The pieces stack together to create the body, while a glass vessel sits within to hold the plant itself. The collection has been presented during the London Design Festival 2014 at the 19 Greek Street gallery. 
See more at: DesignBoom
Zoom Info
Babilus Vases - Nir Meiri
These vase designs reference ancient architecture such as temples and altars by clustering together at differing heights to resemble a series of classical buildings. Forged from bamboo, strand board, glass and corian, they come in a range of sizes to house plants of various types. 
The pieces stack together to create the body, while a glass vessel sits within to hold the plant itself. The collection has been presented during the London Design Festival 2014 at the 19 Greek Street gallery. 
See more at: DesignBoom
Zoom Info
Babilus Vases - Nir Meiri
These vase designs reference ancient architecture such as temples and altars by clustering together at differing heights to resemble a series of classical buildings. Forged from bamboo, strand board, glass and corian, they come in a range of sizes to house plants of various types. 
The pieces stack together to create the body, while a glass vessel sits within to hold the plant itself. The collection has been presented during the London Design Festival 2014 at the 19 Greek Street gallery. 
See more at: DesignBoom
Zoom Info
Babilus Vases - Nir Meiri
These vase designs reference ancient architecture such as temples and altars by clustering together at differing heights to resemble a series of classical buildings. Forged from bamboo, strand board, glass and corian, they come in a range of sizes to house plants of various types. 
The pieces stack together to create the body, while a glass vessel sits within to hold the plant itself. The collection has been presented during the London Design Festival 2014 at the 19 Greek Street gallery. 
See more at: DesignBoom
Zoom Info

Babilus Vases - Nir Meiri

These vase designs reference ancient architecture such as temples and altars by clustering together at differing heights to resemble a series of classical buildings. Forged from bamboo, strand board, glass and corian, they come in a range of sizes to house plants of various types. 

The pieces stack together to create the body, while a glass vessel sits within to hold the plant itself. The collection has been presented during the London Design Festival 2014 at the 19 Greek Street gallery. 

See more at: DesignBoom

Hotel Cycle - Suppose Design Office
Part of the Onomichi U2 development in the Hiroshima Prefecture, Japan (a complex dedicated to cycling), this hotel has been created from a converted warehouse. The complex features a bike shop, clothing shop, bar and restaurant in addition to the hotel, all catering specifically to cyclists. The whole place has an industrial feel, with heavy steel frameworks and exposed concrete featuring throughout. 
My favourite features are the hooks in every one of the 28 suites that let you display your bike on the wall during your stay. You can even check-in while still on your bike!
See more at: Dezeen
Zoom Info
Hotel Cycle - Suppose Design Office
Part of the Onomichi U2 development in the Hiroshima Prefecture, Japan (a complex dedicated to cycling), this hotel has been created from a converted warehouse. The complex features a bike shop, clothing shop, bar and restaurant in addition to the hotel, all catering specifically to cyclists. The whole place has an industrial feel, with heavy steel frameworks and exposed concrete featuring throughout. 
My favourite features are the hooks in every one of the 28 suites that let you display your bike on the wall during your stay. You can even check-in while still on your bike!
See more at: Dezeen
Zoom Info
Hotel Cycle - Suppose Design Office
Part of the Onomichi U2 development in the Hiroshima Prefecture, Japan (a complex dedicated to cycling), this hotel has been created from a converted warehouse. The complex features a bike shop, clothing shop, bar and restaurant in addition to the hotel, all catering specifically to cyclists. The whole place has an industrial feel, with heavy steel frameworks and exposed concrete featuring throughout. 
My favourite features are the hooks in every one of the 28 suites that let you display your bike on the wall during your stay. You can even check-in while still on your bike!
See more at: Dezeen
Zoom Info
Hotel Cycle - Suppose Design Office
Part of the Onomichi U2 development in the Hiroshima Prefecture, Japan (a complex dedicated to cycling), this hotel has been created from a converted warehouse. The complex features a bike shop, clothing shop, bar and restaurant in addition to the hotel, all catering specifically to cyclists. The whole place has an industrial feel, with heavy steel frameworks and exposed concrete featuring throughout. 
My favourite features are the hooks in every one of the 28 suites that let you display your bike on the wall during your stay. You can even check-in while still on your bike!
See more at: Dezeen
Zoom Info
Hotel Cycle - Suppose Design Office
Part of the Onomichi U2 development in the Hiroshima Prefecture, Japan (a complex dedicated to cycling), this hotel has been created from a converted warehouse. The complex features a bike shop, clothing shop, bar and restaurant in addition to the hotel, all catering specifically to cyclists. The whole place has an industrial feel, with heavy steel frameworks and exposed concrete featuring throughout. 
My favourite features are the hooks in every one of the 28 suites that let you display your bike on the wall during your stay. You can even check-in while still on your bike!
See more at: Dezeen
Zoom Info
Hotel Cycle - Suppose Design Office
Part of the Onomichi U2 development in the Hiroshima Prefecture, Japan (a complex dedicated to cycling), this hotel has been created from a converted warehouse. The complex features a bike shop, clothing shop, bar and restaurant in addition to the hotel, all catering specifically to cyclists. The whole place has an industrial feel, with heavy steel frameworks and exposed concrete featuring throughout. 
My favourite features are the hooks in every one of the 28 suites that let you display your bike on the wall during your stay. You can even check-in while still on your bike!
See more at: Dezeen
Zoom Info
Hotel Cycle - Suppose Design Office
Part of the Onomichi U2 development in the Hiroshima Prefecture, Japan (a complex dedicated to cycling), this hotel has been created from a converted warehouse. The complex features a bike shop, clothing shop, bar and restaurant in addition to the hotel, all catering specifically to cyclists. The whole place has an industrial feel, with heavy steel frameworks and exposed concrete featuring throughout. 
My favourite features are the hooks in every one of the 28 suites that let you display your bike on the wall during your stay. You can even check-in while still on your bike!
See more at: Dezeen
Zoom Info
Hotel Cycle - Suppose Design Office
Part of the Onomichi U2 development in the Hiroshima Prefecture, Japan (a complex dedicated to cycling), this hotel has been created from a converted warehouse. The complex features a bike shop, clothing shop, bar and restaurant in addition to the hotel, all catering specifically to cyclists. The whole place has an industrial feel, with heavy steel frameworks and exposed concrete featuring throughout. 
My favourite features are the hooks in every one of the 28 suites that let you display your bike on the wall during your stay. You can even check-in while still on your bike!
See more at: Dezeen
Zoom Info
Hotel Cycle - Suppose Design Office
Part of the Onomichi U2 development in the Hiroshima Prefecture, Japan (a complex dedicated to cycling), this hotel has been created from a converted warehouse. The complex features a bike shop, clothing shop, bar and restaurant in addition to the hotel, all catering specifically to cyclists. The whole place has an industrial feel, with heavy steel frameworks and exposed concrete featuring throughout. 
My favourite features are the hooks in every one of the 28 suites that let you display your bike on the wall during your stay. You can even check-in while still on your bike!
See more at: Dezeen
Zoom Info

Hotel Cycle - Suppose Design Office

Part of the Onomichi U2 development in the Hiroshima Prefecture, Japan (a complex dedicated to cycling), this hotel has been created from a converted warehouse. The complex features a bike shop, clothing shop, bar and restaurant in addition to the hotel, all catering specifically to cyclists. The whole place has an industrial feel, with heavy steel frameworks and exposed concrete featuring throughout. 

My favourite features are the hooks in every one of the 28 suites that let you display your bike on the wall during your stay. You can even check-in while still on your bike!

See more at: Dezeen

D-N SF 12 PG VI - Atrium space in Venice’s Palazzo Grassi has been transformed into a seemingly endless white expanse by artist Doug Wheeler
As part of an exhibition showcasing illusions with light, the oddly titled D-N SF 12 PG VI installation by Doug Wheeler utilises a white backdrop comprised of fibreglass which is illuminated by LEDs to fool the eye into believing the space is endless. If a visitor ventures far enough inside and faces away from the entrance, it can appear as though they’re utterly lost in light.
“Light becomes matter and redefines space and time by eliminating the perceptual markers of the visitor, who is left between a mirage and reality, nature and artifice, fullness and emptiness, moment and duration” 
Certainly a fascinating piece, but does it remind anyone else of the hyperbolic time chamber from a certain classic anime? (fans will get it)
See more at: Dezeen
Zoom Info
D-N SF 12 PG VI - Atrium space in Venice’s Palazzo Grassi has been transformed into a seemingly endless white expanse by artist Doug Wheeler
As part of an exhibition showcasing illusions with light, the oddly titled D-N SF 12 PG VI installation by Doug Wheeler utilises a white backdrop comprised of fibreglass which is illuminated by LEDs to fool the eye into believing the space is endless. If a visitor ventures far enough inside and faces away from the entrance, it can appear as though they’re utterly lost in light.
“Light becomes matter and redefines space and time by eliminating the perceptual markers of the visitor, who is left between a mirage and reality, nature and artifice, fullness and emptiness, moment and duration” 
Certainly a fascinating piece, but does it remind anyone else of the hyperbolic time chamber from a certain classic anime? (fans will get it)
See more at: Dezeen
Zoom Info
D-N SF 12 PG VI - Atrium space in Venice’s Palazzo Grassi has been transformed into a seemingly endless white expanse by artist Doug Wheeler
As part of an exhibition showcasing illusions with light, the oddly titled D-N SF 12 PG VI installation by Doug Wheeler utilises a white backdrop comprised of fibreglass which is illuminated by LEDs to fool the eye into believing the space is endless. If a visitor ventures far enough inside and faces away from the entrance, it can appear as though they’re utterly lost in light.
“Light becomes matter and redefines space and time by eliminating the perceptual markers of the visitor, who is left between a mirage and reality, nature and artifice, fullness and emptiness, moment and duration” 
Certainly a fascinating piece, but does it remind anyone else of the hyperbolic time chamber from a certain classic anime? (fans will get it)
See more at: Dezeen
Zoom Info
D-N SF 12 PG VI - Atrium space in Venice’s Palazzo Grassi has been transformed into a seemingly endless white expanse by artist Doug Wheeler
As part of an exhibition showcasing illusions with light, the oddly titled D-N SF 12 PG VI installation by Doug Wheeler utilises a white backdrop comprised of fibreglass which is illuminated by LEDs to fool the eye into believing the space is endless. If a visitor ventures far enough inside and faces away from the entrance, it can appear as though they’re utterly lost in light.
“Light becomes matter and redefines space and time by eliminating the perceptual markers of the visitor, who is left between a mirage and reality, nature and artifice, fullness and emptiness, moment and duration” 
Certainly a fascinating piece, but does it remind anyone else of the hyperbolic time chamber from a certain classic anime? (fans will get it)
See more at: Dezeen
Zoom Info
D-N SF 12 PG VI - Atrium space in Venice’s Palazzo Grassi has been transformed into a seemingly endless white expanse by artist Doug Wheeler
As part of an exhibition showcasing illusions with light, the oddly titled D-N SF 12 PG VI installation by Doug Wheeler utilises a white backdrop comprised of fibreglass which is illuminated by LEDs to fool the eye into believing the space is endless. If a visitor ventures far enough inside and faces away from the entrance, it can appear as though they’re utterly lost in light.
“Light becomes matter and redefines space and time by eliminating the perceptual markers of the visitor, who is left between a mirage and reality, nature and artifice, fullness and emptiness, moment and duration” 
Certainly a fascinating piece, but does it remind anyone else of the hyperbolic time chamber from a certain classic anime? (fans will get it)
See more at: Dezeen
Zoom Info
D-N SF 12 PG VI - Atrium space in Venice’s Palazzo Grassi has been transformed into a seemingly endless white expanse by artist Doug Wheeler
As part of an exhibition showcasing illusions with light, the oddly titled D-N SF 12 PG VI installation by Doug Wheeler utilises a white backdrop comprised of fibreglass which is illuminated by LEDs to fool the eye into believing the space is endless. If a visitor ventures far enough inside and faces away from the entrance, it can appear as though they’re utterly lost in light.
“Light becomes matter and redefines space and time by eliminating the perceptual markers of the visitor, who is left between a mirage and reality, nature and artifice, fullness and emptiness, moment and duration” 
Certainly a fascinating piece, but does it remind anyone else of the hyperbolic time chamber from a certain classic anime? (fans will get it)
See more at: Dezeen
Zoom Info

D-N SF 12 PG VI - Atrium space in Venice’s Palazzo Grassi has been transformed into a seemingly endless white expanse by artist Doug Wheeler

As part of an exhibition showcasing illusions with light, the oddly titled D-N SF 12 PG VI installation by Doug Wheeler utilises a white backdrop comprised of fibreglass which is illuminated by LEDs to fool the eye into believing the space is endless. If a visitor ventures far enough inside and faces away from the entrance, it can appear as though they’re utterly lost in light.

Light becomes matter and redefines space and time by eliminating the perceptual markers of the visitor, who is left between a mirage and reality, nature and artifice, fullness and emptiness, moment and duration” 

Certainly a fascinating piece, but does it remind anyone else of the hyperbolic time chamber from a certain classic anime? (fans will get it)

See more at: Dezeen

Hard Copy - 'impossible' garments by Noa Raviv
Tel Aviv based fashion designer Noa Raviv has created a range of complex 3D printed garments that make use of ‘impossible’ programming. By entering what she describes as ‘impossible commands’ into a rendering program, the resulting mess-ups created explosive, abstract forms she then printed into wearable garments. 
“I think in our world, sometimes things get mixed. You don’t always know what’s the copy and what’s the source,” Raviv said. “It’s often confusing, so I wanted to create this confusion between the 2D and 3D, and the real and the virtual”
See more at noaraviv.com
Zoom Info
Hard Copy - 'impossible' garments by Noa Raviv
Tel Aviv based fashion designer Noa Raviv has created a range of complex 3D printed garments that make use of ‘impossible’ programming. By entering what she describes as ‘impossible commands’ into a rendering program, the resulting mess-ups created explosive, abstract forms she then printed into wearable garments. 
“I think in our world, sometimes things get mixed. You don’t always know what’s the copy and what’s the source,” Raviv said. “It’s often confusing, so I wanted to create this confusion between the 2D and 3D, and the real and the virtual”
See more at noaraviv.com
Zoom Info
Hard Copy - 'impossible' garments by Noa Raviv
Tel Aviv based fashion designer Noa Raviv has created a range of complex 3D printed garments that make use of ‘impossible’ programming. By entering what she describes as ‘impossible commands’ into a rendering program, the resulting mess-ups created explosive, abstract forms she then printed into wearable garments. 
“I think in our world, sometimes things get mixed. You don’t always know what’s the copy and what’s the source,” Raviv said. “It’s often confusing, so I wanted to create this confusion between the 2D and 3D, and the real and the virtual”
See more at noaraviv.com
Zoom Info
Hard Copy - 'impossible' garments by Noa Raviv
Tel Aviv based fashion designer Noa Raviv has created a range of complex 3D printed garments that make use of ‘impossible’ programming. By entering what she describes as ‘impossible commands’ into a rendering program, the resulting mess-ups created explosive, abstract forms she then printed into wearable garments. 
“I think in our world, sometimes things get mixed. You don’t always know what’s the copy and what’s the source,” Raviv said. “It’s often confusing, so I wanted to create this confusion between the 2D and 3D, and the real and the virtual”
See more at noaraviv.com
Zoom Info
Hard Copy - 'impossible' garments by Noa Raviv
Tel Aviv based fashion designer Noa Raviv has created a range of complex 3D printed garments that make use of ‘impossible’ programming. By entering what she describes as ‘impossible commands’ into a rendering program, the resulting mess-ups created explosive, abstract forms she then printed into wearable garments. 
“I think in our world, sometimes things get mixed. You don’t always know what’s the copy and what’s the source,” Raviv said. “It’s often confusing, so I wanted to create this confusion between the 2D and 3D, and the real and the virtual”
See more at noaraviv.com
Zoom Info
Hard Copy - 'impossible' garments by Noa Raviv
Tel Aviv based fashion designer Noa Raviv has created a range of complex 3D printed garments that make use of ‘impossible’ programming. By entering what she describes as ‘impossible commands’ into a rendering program, the resulting mess-ups created explosive, abstract forms she then printed into wearable garments. 
“I think in our world, sometimes things get mixed. You don’t always know what’s the copy and what’s the source,” Raviv said. “It’s often confusing, so I wanted to create this confusion between the 2D and 3D, and the real and the virtual”
See more at noaraviv.com
Zoom Info
Hard Copy - 'impossible' garments by Noa Raviv
Tel Aviv based fashion designer Noa Raviv has created a range of complex 3D printed garments that make use of ‘impossible’ programming. By entering what she describes as ‘impossible commands’ into a rendering program, the resulting mess-ups created explosive, abstract forms she then printed into wearable garments. 
“I think in our world, sometimes things get mixed. You don’t always know what’s the copy and what’s the source,” Raviv said. “It’s often confusing, so I wanted to create this confusion between the 2D and 3D, and the real and the virtual”
See more at noaraviv.com
Zoom Info
Hard Copy - 'impossible' garments by Noa Raviv
Tel Aviv based fashion designer Noa Raviv has created a range of complex 3D printed garments that make use of ‘impossible’ programming. By entering what she describes as ‘impossible commands’ into a rendering program, the resulting mess-ups created explosive, abstract forms she then printed into wearable garments. 
“I think in our world, sometimes things get mixed. You don’t always know what’s the copy and what’s the source,” Raviv said. “It’s often confusing, so I wanted to create this confusion between the 2D and 3D, and the real and the virtual”
See more at noaraviv.com
Zoom Info
Hard Copy - 'impossible' garments by Noa Raviv
Tel Aviv based fashion designer Noa Raviv has created a range of complex 3D printed garments that make use of ‘impossible’ programming. By entering what she describes as ‘impossible commands’ into a rendering program, the resulting mess-ups created explosive, abstract forms she then printed into wearable garments. 
“I think in our world, sometimes things get mixed. You don’t always know what’s the copy and what’s the source,” Raviv said. “It’s often confusing, so I wanted to create this confusion between the 2D and 3D, and the real and the virtual”
See more at noaraviv.com
Zoom Info

Hard Copy - 'impossible' garments by Noa Raviv

Tel Aviv based fashion designer Noa Raviv has created a range of complex 3D printed garments that make use of ‘impossible’ programming. By entering what she describes as ‘impossible commands’ into a rendering program, the resulting mess-ups created explosive, abstract forms she then printed into wearable garments. 

I think in our world, sometimes things get mixed. You don’t always know what’s the copy and what’s the source,” Raviv said. “It’s often confusing, so I wanted to create this confusion between the 2D and 3D, and the real and the virtual”

See more at noaraviv.com

Hyundai Card Travel Library - Wonderwall
This amazing library and cafe interior in South Korea is a celebration of fractured geometry and irregular forms. It has been designed to communicate the diversity of both the information it exhibits and the people who visit it; a point that is partially accentuated by the collection of chairs sourced from around the world that line the table in the cafe area… envisioned by its designers as the spot where people meet and cultures collide. The staircase that jaggedly winds its way up the centre of the space is fantastic too. 
See more at: ArchDaily
Zoom Info
Hyundai Card Travel Library - Wonderwall
This amazing library and cafe interior in South Korea is a celebration of fractured geometry and irregular forms. It has been designed to communicate the diversity of both the information it exhibits and the people who visit it; a point that is partially accentuated by the collection of chairs sourced from around the world that line the table in the cafe area… envisioned by its designers as the spot where people meet and cultures collide. The staircase that jaggedly winds its way up the centre of the space is fantastic too. 
See more at: ArchDaily
Zoom Info
Hyundai Card Travel Library - Wonderwall
This amazing library and cafe interior in South Korea is a celebration of fractured geometry and irregular forms. It has been designed to communicate the diversity of both the information it exhibits and the people who visit it; a point that is partially accentuated by the collection of chairs sourced from around the world that line the table in the cafe area… envisioned by its designers as the spot where people meet and cultures collide. The staircase that jaggedly winds its way up the centre of the space is fantastic too. 
See more at: ArchDaily
Zoom Info
Hyundai Card Travel Library - Wonderwall
This amazing library and cafe interior in South Korea is a celebration of fractured geometry and irregular forms. It has been designed to communicate the diversity of both the information it exhibits and the people who visit it; a point that is partially accentuated by the collection of chairs sourced from around the world that line the table in the cafe area… envisioned by its designers as the spot where people meet and cultures collide. The staircase that jaggedly winds its way up the centre of the space is fantastic too. 
See more at: ArchDaily
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Hyundai Card Travel Library - Wonderwall
This amazing library and cafe interior in South Korea is a celebration of fractured geometry and irregular forms. It has been designed to communicate the diversity of both the information it exhibits and the people who visit it; a point that is partially accentuated by the collection of chairs sourced from around the world that line the table in the cafe area… envisioned by its designers as the spot where people meet and cultures collide. The staircase that jaggedly winds its way up the centre of the space is fantastic too. 
See more at: ArchDaily
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Hyundai Card Travel Library - Wonderwall
This amazing library and cafe interior in South Korea is a celebration of fractured geometry and irregular forms. It has been designed to communicate the diversity of both the information it exhibits and the people who visit it; a point that is partially accentuated by the collection of chairs sourced from around the world that line the table in the cafe area… envisioned by its designers as the spot where people meet and cultures collide. The staircase that jaggedly winds its way up the centre of the space is fantastic too. 
See more at: ArchDaily
Zoom Info
Hyundai Card Travel Library - Wonderwall
This amazing library and cafe interior in South Korea is a celebration of fractured geometry and irregular forms. It has been designed to communicate the diversity of both the information it exhibits and the people who visit it; a point that is partially accentuated by the collection of chairs sourced from around the world that line the table in the cafe area… envisioned by its designers as the spot where people meet and cultures collide. The staircase that jaggedly winds its way up the centre of the space is fantastic too. 
See more at: ArchDaily
Zoom Info

Hyundai Card Travel Library - Wonderwall

This amazing library and cafe interior in South Korea is a celebration of fractured geometry and irregular forms. It has been designed to communicate the diversity of both the information it exhibits and the people who visit it; a point that is partially accentuated by the collection of chairs sourced from around the world that line the table in the cafe area… envisioned by its designers as the spot where people meet and cultures collide. The staircase that jaggedly winds its way up the centre of the space is fantastic too. 

See more at: ArchDaily

Staircase from the SAI Project, Seoul.
This fantastic staircase mirrors the unfinished, industrial feel of the rest of the narrow building that sits between two high rise blocks in Seoul. The project was well underway but abandoned midway through completion when the original clients ran out of money. Rather than leave the space as it was, the designers commissioned South Korean architect Moon Hoon to continue the build for a new use. Hoon decided to leave the five storey high steel structure as it was, adapting it into a huge urban greenhouse that will soon be filled with plants. 
I love the way the structure appears to hang in the space, giving it a raw, unfinished quality.
See more at: Dezeen
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Staircase from the SAI Project, Seoul.
This fantastic staircase mirrors the unfinished, industrial feel of the rest of the narrow building that sits between two high rise blocks in Seoul. The project was well underway but abandoned midway through completion when the original clients ran out of money. Rather than leave the space as it was, the designers commissioned South Korean architect Moon Hoon to continue the build for a new use. Hoon decided to leave the five storey high steel structure as it was, adapting it into a huge urban greenhouse that will soon be filled with plants. 
I love the way the structure appears to hang in the space, giving it a raw, unfinished quality.
See more at: Dezeen
Zoom Info

Staircase from the SAI Project, Seoul.

This fantastic staircase mirrors the unfinished, industrial feel of the rest of the narrow building that sits between two high rise blocks in Seoul. The project was well underway but abandoned midway through completion when the original clients ran out of money. Rather than leave the space as it was, the designers commissioned South Korean architect Moon Hoon to continue the build for a new use. Hoon decided to leave the five storey high steel structure as it was, adapting it into a huge urban greenhouse that will soon be filled with plants. 

I love the way the structure appears to hang in the space, giving it a raw, unfinished quality.

See more at: Dezeen

Breaking Wave - Hypersonic
This fascinating kinetic orb sculpture arranges itself to represent the natural patterns that occur in random data streams. 804 individually-manipulated orbs hang in constant motion, responding to preassigned patterns derived from nature… making it the latest of Hypersonic’s explorations into biotechnology. 
See more, plus a video of the piece in motion, at: The Creators Project
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Breaking Wave - Hypersonic
This fascinating kinetic orb sculpture arranges itself to represent the natural patterns that occur in random data streams. 804 individually-manipulated orbs hang in constant motion, responding to preassigned patterns derived from nature… making it the latest of Hypersonic’s explorations into biotechnology. 
See more, plus a video of the piece in motion, at: The Creators Project
Zoom Info
Breaking Wave - Hypersonic
This fascinating kinetic orb sculpture arranges itself to represent the natural patterns that occur in random data streams. 804 individually-manipulated orbs hang in constant motion, responding to preassigned patterns derived from nature… making it the latest of Hypersonic’s explorations into biotechnology. 
See more, plus a video of the piece in motion, at: The Creators Project
Zoom Info
Breaking Wave - Hypersonic
This fascinating kinetic orb sculpture arranges itself to represent the natural patterns that occur in random data streams. 804 individually-manipulated orbs hang in constant motion, responding to preassigned patterns derived from nature… making it the latest of Hypersonic’s explorations into biotechnology. 
See more, plus a video of the piece in motion, at: The Creators Project
Zoom Info
Breaking Wave - Hypersonic
This fascinating kinetic orb sculpture arranges itself to represent the natural patterns that occur in random data streams. 804 individually-manipulated orbs hang in constant motion, responding to preassigned patterns derived from nature… making it the latest of Hypersonic’s explorations into biotechnology. 
See more, plus a video of the piece in motion, at: The Creators Project
Zoom Info
Breaking Wave - Hypersonic
This fascinating kinetic orb sculpture arranges itself to represent the natural patterns that occur in random data streams. 804 individually-manipulated orbs hang in constant motion, responding to preassigned patterns derived from nature… making it the latest of Hypersonic’s explorations into biotechnology. 
See more, plus a video of the piece in motion, at: The Creators Project
Zoom Info
Breaking Wave - Hypersonic
This fascinating kinetic orb sculpture arranges itself to represent the natural patterns that occur in random data streams. 804 individually-manipulated orbs hang in constant motion, responding to preassigned patterns derived from nature… making it the latest of Hypersonic’s explorations into biotechnology. 
See more, plus a video of the piece in motion, at: The Creators Project
Zoom Info
Breaking Wave - Hypersonic
This fascinating kinetic orb sculpture arranges itself to represent the natural patterns that occur in random data streams. 804 individually-manipulated orbs hang in constant motion, responding to preassigned patterns derived from nature… making it the latest of Hypersonic’s explorations into biotechnology. 
See more, plus a video of the piece in motion, at: The Creators Project
Zoom Info

Breaking Wave - Hypersonic

This fascinating kinetic orb sculpture arranges itself to represent the natural patterns that occur in random data streams. 804 individually-manipulated orbs hang in constant motion, responding to preassigned patterns derived from nature… making it the latest of Hypersonic’s explorations into biotechnology. 

See more, plus a video of the piece in motion, at: The Creators Project