Tilia Coat Stand - Alicja Prussakowska
This pine coat stand and hallway seating was produced using traditional wood bending techniques and resembles skis stacked in place. 
"My goal was to design an object that was both useful and visually attractive. I noticed a correlation in the shape of a bending grass and ergonomic and friendly shaped objects on which you can hang something. This detail highlights the beauty and nobility of the wood and the value of traditional craft”
See more at: Dezeen
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Tilia Coat Stand - Alicja Prussakowska
This pine coat stand and hallway seating was produced using traditional wood bending techniques and resembles skis stacked in place. 
"My goal was to design an object that was both useful and visually attractive. I noticed a correlation in the shape of a bending grass and ergonomic and friendly shaped objects on which you can hang something. This detail highlights the beauty and nobility of the wood and the value of traditional craft”
See more at: Dezeen
Zoom Info
Tilia Coat Stand - Alicja Prussakowska
This pine coat stand and hallway seating was produced using traditional wood bending techniques and resembles skis stacked in place. 
"My goal was to design an object that was both useful and visually attractive. I noticed a correlation in the shape of a bending grass and ergonomic and friendly shaped objects on which you can hang something. This detail highlights the beauty and nobility of the wood and the value of traditional craft”
See more at: Dezeen
Zoom Info
Tilia Coat Stand - Alicja Prussakowska
This pine coat stand and hallway seating was produced using traditional wood bending techniques and resembles skis stacked in place. 
"My goal was to design an object that was both useful and visually attractive. I noticed a correlation in the shape of a bending grass and ergonomic and friendly shaped objects on which you can hang something. This detail highlights the beauty and nobility of the wood and the value of traditional craft”
See more at: Dezeen
Zoom Info
Tilia Coat Stand - Alicja Prussakowska
This pine coat stand and hallway seating was produced using traditional wood bending techniques and resembles skis stacked in place. 
"My goal was to design an object that was both useful and visually attractive. I noticed a correlation in the shape of a bending grass and ergonomic and friendly shaped objects on which you can hang something. This detail highlights the beauty and nobility of the wood and the value of traditional craft”
See more at: Dezeen
Zoom Info

Tilia Coat Stand - Alicja Prussakowska

This pine coat stand and hallway seating was produced using traditional wood bending techniques and resembles skis stacked in place. 

"My goal was to design an object that was both useful and visually attractive. I noticed a correlation in the shape of a bending grass and ergonomic and friendly shaped objects on which you can hang something. This detail highlights the beauty and nobility of the wood and the value of traditional craft”

See more at: Dezeen

The Unstealable Bike? The Yerka Project Bicycle - Yerka
Designed by 3 engineering students in Chile, the Yerka bike features a locking frame integrated into its body that wraps around objects to protect it from thieves. Most conventional locks can be broken and the bike can be taken away entirely intact. With the Yerka bike, the only way to break the lock is to break the frame itself, rendering the bike inoperable. What’s more, the lock only takes 20 seconds to set up and you’re away. 
See more at: DesignBoom
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The Unstealable Bike? The Yerka Project Bicycle - Yerka
Designed by 3 engineering students in Chile, the Yerka bike features a locking frame integrated into its body that wraps around objects to protect it from thieves. Most conventional locks can be broken and the bike can be taken away entirely intact. With the Yerka bike, the only way to break the lock is to break the frame itself, rendering the bike inoperable. What’s more, the lock only takes 20 seconds to set up and you’re away. 
See more at: DesignBoom
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The Unstealable Bike? The Yerka Project Bicycle - Yerka
Designed by 3 engineering students in Chile, the Yerka bike features a locking frame integrated into its body that wraps around objects to protect it from thieves. Most conventional locks can be broken and the bike can be taken away entirely intact. With the Yerka bike, the only way to break the lock is to break the frame itself, rendering the bike inoperable. What’s more, the lock only takes 20 seconds to set up and you’re away. 
See more at: DesignBoom
Zoom Info
The Unstealable Bike? The Yerka Project Bicycle - Yerka
Designed by 3 engineering students in Chile, the Yerka bike features a locking frame integrated into its body that wraps around objects to protect it from thieves. Most conventional locks can be broken and the bike can be taken away entirely intact. With the Yerka bike, the only way to break the lock is to break the frame itself, rendering the bike inoperable. What’s more, the lock only takes 20 seconds to set up and you’re away. 
See more at: DesignBoom
Zoom Info
The Unstealable Bike? The Yerka Project Bicycle - Yerka
Designed by 3 engineering students in Chile, the Yerka bike features a locking frame integrated into its body that wraps around objects to protect it from thieves. Most conventional locks can be broken and the bike can be taken away entirely intact. With the Yerka bike, the only way to break the lock is to break the frame itself, rendering the bike inoperable. What’s more, the lock only takes 20 seconds to set up and you’re away. 
See more at: DesignBoom
Zoom Info
The Unstealable Bike? The Yerka Project Bicycle - Yerka
Designed by 3 engineering students in Chile, the Yerka bike features a locking frame integrated into its body that wraps around objects to protect it from thieves. Most conventional locks can be broken and the bike can be taken away entirely intact. With the Yerka bike, the only way to break the lock is to break the frame itself, rendering the bike inoperable. What’s more, the lock only takes 20 seconds to set up and you’re away. 
See more at: DesignBoom
Zoom Info

The Unstealable Bike? The Yerka Project Bicycle - Yerka

Designed by 3 engineering students in Chile, the Yerka bike features a locking frame integrated into its body that wraps around objects to protect it from thieves. Most conventional locks can be broken and the bike can be taken away entirely intact. With the Yerka bike, the only way to break the lock is to break the frame itself, rendering the bike inoperable. What’s more, the lock only takes 20 seconds to set up and you’re away. 

See more at: DesignBoom

Digital etchings from the International Architecture Biennale in Rotterdam
Johan Voordouw and Aisha Sawatsky have produced a series of twelve digital etchings, each of which contains a folly that articulates a particular weather condition, in a project that explores the impact climate change could have on our architecture in the future. Each image is set in a different province of the Netherlands and contains a particular weather condition, in a particular month of the year, with an activity centred around those conditions; representing the country of a whole. 
The images were digitally produced and transferred onto a polymer plate before being printed on 250gsm Arches Cover paper.
See the full set at: eVolo
Zoom Info
Digital etchings from the International Architecture Biennale in Rotterdam
Johan Voordouw and Aisha Sawatsky have produced a series of twelve digital etchings, each of which contains a folly that articulates a particular weather condition, in a project that explores the impact climate change could have on our architecture in the future. Each image is set in a different province of the Netherlands and contains a particular weather condition, in a particular month of the year, with an activity centred around those conditions; representing the country of a whole. 
The images were digitally produced and transferred onto a polymer plate before being printed on 250gsm Arches Cover paper.
See the full set at: eVolo
Zoom Info
Digital etchings from the International Architecture Biennale in Rotterdam
Johan Voordouw and Aisha Sawatsky have produced a series of twelve digital etchings, each of which contains a folly that articulates a particular weather condition, in a project that explores the impact climate change could have on our architecture in the future. Each image is set in a different province of the Netherlands and contains a particular weather condition, in a particular month of the year, with an activity centred around those conditions; representing the country of a whole. 
The images were digitally produced and transferred onto a polymer plate before being printed on 250gsm Arches Cover paper.
See the full set at: eVolo
Zoom Info
Digital etchings from the International Architecture Biennale in Rotterdam
Johan Voordouw and Aisha Sawatsky have produced a series of twelve digital etchings, each of which contains a folly that articulates a particular weather condition, in a project that explores the impact climate change could have on our architecture in the future. Each image is set in a different province of the Netherlands and contains a particular weather condition, in a particular month of the year, with an activity centred around those conditions; representing the country of a whole. 
The images were digitally produced and transferred onto a polymer plate before being printed on 250gsm Arches Cover paper.
See the full set at: eVolo
Zoom Info
Digital etchings from the International Architecture Biennale in Rotterdam
Johan Voordouw and Aisha Sawatsky have produced a series of twelve digital etchings, each of which contains a folly that articulates a particular weather condition, in a project that explores the impact climate change could have on our architecture in the future. Each image is set in a different province of the Netherlands and contains a particular weather condition, in a particular month of the year, with an activity centred around those conditions; representing the country of a whole. 
The images were digitally produced and transferred onto a polymer plate before being printed on 250gsm Arches Cover paper.
See the full set at: eVolo
Zoom Info
Digital etchings from the International Architecture Biennale in Rotterdam
Johan Voordouw and Aisha Sawatsky have produced a series of twelve digital etchings, each of which contains a folly that articulates a particular weather condition, in a project that explores the impact climate change could have on our architecture in the future. Each image is set in a different province of the Netherlands and contains a particular weather condition, in a particular month of the year, with an activity centred around those conditions; representing the country of a whole. 
The images were digitally produced and transferred onto a polymer plate before being printed on 250gsm Arches Cover paper.
See the full set at: eVolo
Zoom Info
Digital etchings from the International Architecture Biennale in Rotterdam
Johan Voordouw and Aisha Sawatsky have produced a series of twelve digital etchings, each of which contains a folly that articulates a particular weather condition, in a project that explores the impact climate change could have on our architecture in the future. Each image is set in a different province of the Netherlands and contains a particular weather condition, in a particular month of the year, with an activity centred around those conditions; representing the country of a whole. 
The images were digitally produced and transferred onto a polymer plate before being printed on 250gsm Arches Cover paper.
See the full set at: eVolo
Zoom Info
Digital etchings from the International Architecture Biennale in Rotterdam
Johan Voordouw and Aisha Sawatsky have produced a series of twelve digital etchings, each of which contains a folly that articulates a particular weather condition, in a project that explores the impact climate change could have on our architecture in the future. Each image is set in a different province of the Netherlands and contains a particular weather condition, in a particular month of the year, with an activity centred around those conditions; representing the country of a whole. 
The images were digitally produced and transferred onto a polymer plate before being printed on 250gsm Arches Cover paper.
See the full set at: eVolo
Zoom Info

Digital etchings from the International Architecture Biennale in Rotterdam

Johan Voordouw and Aisha Sawatsky have produced a series of twelve digital etchings, each of which contains a folly that articulates a particular weather condition, in a project that explores the impact climate change could have on our architecture in the future. Each image is set in a different province of the Netherlands and contains a particular weather condition, in a particular month of the year, with an activity centred around those conditions; representing the country of a whole. 

The images were digitally produced and transferred onto a polymer plate before being printed on 250gsm Arches Cover paper.

See the full set at: eVolo

21 Wapping Lane - Amos & Amos
Interior architecture firm Amos & Amos have produced two penthouse apartment interiors that celebrate British design with artefacts from Tom Dixon, Lee Broom and Bethan Gray featuring throughout. The 18-storey apartment building in East London was built by property developer Ballymore and is the first new building in the Wapping area for more than a decade.
The interiors feature soft pastel colours and subtle materials, with the kitchen spaces at one corner of the property and bedrooms at the other. Each penthouse takes advantage of 360 degree views out across the city. 
See more at: Dezeen
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21 Wapping Lane - Amos & Amos
Interior architecture firm Amos & Amos have produced two penthouse apartment interiors that celebrate British design with artefacts from Tom Dixon, Lee Broom and Bethan Gray featuring throughout. The 18-storey apartment building in East London was built by property developer Ballymore and is the first new building in the Wapping area for more than a decade.
The interiors feature soft pastel colours and subtle materials, with the kitchen spaces at one corner of the property and bedrooms at the other. Each penthouse takes advantage of 360 degree views out across the city. 
See more at: Dezeen
Zoom Info
21 Wapping Lane - Amos & Amos
Interior architecture firm Amos & Amos have produced two penthouse apartment interiors that celebrate British design with artefacts from Tom Dixon, Lee Broom and Bethan Gray featuring throughout. The 18-storey apartment building in East London was built by property developer Ballymore and is the first new building in the Wapping area for more than a decade.
The interiors feature soft pastel colours and subtle materials, with the kitchen spaces at one corner of the property and bedrooms at the other. Each penthouse takes advantage of 360 degree views out across the city. 
See more at: Dezeen
Zoom Info
21 Wapping Lane - Amos & Amos
Interior architecture firm Amos & Amos have produced two penthouse apartment interiors that celebrate British design with artefacts from Tom Dixon, Lee Broom and Bethan Gray featuring throughout. The 18-storey apartment building in East London was built by property developer Ballymore and is the first new building in the Wapping area for more than a decade.
The interiors feature soft pastel colours and subtle materials, with the kitchen spaces at one corner of the property and bedrooms at the other. Each penthouse takes advantage of 360 degree views out across the city. 
See more at: Dezeen
Zoom Info
21 Wapping Lane - Amos & Amos
Interior architecture firm Amos & Amos have produced two penthouse apartment interiors that celebrate British design with artefacts from Tom Dixon, Lee Broom and Bethan Gray featuring throughout. The 18-storey apartment building in East London was built by property developer Ballymore and is the first new building in the Wapping area for more than a decade.
The interiors feature soft pastel colours and subtle materials, with the kitchen spaces at one corner of the property and bedrooms at the other. Each penthouse takes advantage of 360 degree views out across the city. 
See more at: Dezeen
Zoom Info
21 Wapping Lane - Amos & Amos
Interior architecture firm Amos & Amos have produced two penthouse apartment interiors that celebrate British design with artefacts from Tom Dixon, Lee Broom and Bethan Gray featuring throughout. The 18-storey apartment building in East London was built by property developer Ballymore and is the first new building in the Wapping area for more than a decade.
The interiors feature soft pastel colours and subtle materials, with the kitchen spaces at one corner of the property and bedrooms at the other. Each penthouse takes advantage of 360 degree views out across the city. 
See more at: Dezeen
Zoom Info

21 Wapping Lane - Amos & Amos

Interior architecture firm Amos & Amos have produced two penthouse apartment interiors that celebrate British design with artefacts from Tom Dixon, Lee Broom and Bethan Gray featuring throughout. The 18-storey apartment building in East London was built by property developer Ballymore and is the first new building in the Wapping area for more than a decade.

The interiors feature soft pastel colours and subtle materials, with the kitchen spaces at one corner of the property and bedrooms at the other. Each penthouse takes advantage of 360 degree views out across the city. 

See more at: Dezeen

New York Tomorrow - Fundamental
A runner-up concept for a recent competition in New York for a new liveable skyscraper, this concept from Fundamental makes the most of the compact 18 by 70 foot plot by cantilevering over its neighbouring buildings in a chaotic form that serves as a mid-level public lobby area. This lobby is described by its architects as a space that “merges concepts of living, playing and study. It serves as a hybrid machine for people of different preoccupations to meet and talk with each other, to have casual or arranged meetings. This space would convert the tower into a public venue for the community and the neighbourhood”
Technologically speaking, the building is a hub of modern thinking; with deep columns stretching all the way up the superstructure to support the building’s weight, and a north-facing facade that catches and filters the wind for passive ventilation. At the narrow base the building would be accessed by elevators. 
See more at: ArchDaily
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New York Tomorrow - Fundamental
A runner-up concept for a recent competition in New York for a new liveable skyscraper, this concept from Fundamental makes the most of the compact 18 by 70 foot plot by cantilevering over its neighbouring buildings in a chaotic form that serves as a mid-level public lobby area. This lobby is described by its architects as a space that “merges concepts of living, playing and study. It serves as a hybrid machine for people of different preoccupations to meet and talk with each other, to have casual or arranged meetings. This space would convert the tower into a public venue for the community and the neighbourhood”
Technologically speaking, the building is a hub of modern thinking; with deep columns stretching all the way up the superstructure to support the building’s weight, and a north-facing facade that catches and filters the wind for passive ventilation. At the narrow base the building would be accessed by elevators. 
See more at: ArchDaily
Zoom Info
New York Tomorrow - Fundamental
A runner-up concept for a recent competition in New York for a new liveable skyscraper, this concept from Fundamental makes the most of the compact 18 by 70 foot plot by cantilevering over its neighbouring buildings in a chaotic form that serves as a mid-level public lobby area. This lobby is described by its architects as a space that “merges concepts of living, playing and study. It serves as a hybrid machine for people of different preoccupations to meet and talk with each other, to have casual or arranged meetings. This space would convert the tower into a public venue for the community and the neighbourhood”
Technologically speaking, the building is a hub of modern thinking; with deep columns stretching all the way up the superstructure to support the building’s weight, and a north-facing facade that catches and filters the wind for passive ventilation. At the narrow base the building would be accessed by elevators. 
See more at: ArchDaily
Zoom Info
New York Tomorrow - Fundamental
A runner-up concept for a recent competition in New York for a new liveable skyscraper, this concept from Fundamental makes the most of the compact 18 by 70 foot plot by cantilevering over its neighbouring buildings in a chaotic form that serves as a mid-level public lobby area. This lobby is described by its architects as a space that “merges concepts of living, playing and study. It serves as a hybrid machine for people of different preoccupations to meet and talk with each other, to have casual or arranged meetings. This space would convert the tower into a public venue for the community and the neighbourhood”
Technologically speaking, the building is a hub of modern thinking; with deep columns stretching all the way up the superstructure to support the building’s weight, and a north-facing facade that catches and filters the wind for passive ventilation. At the narrow base the building would be accessed by elevators. 
See more at: ArchDaily
Zoom Info
New York Tomorrow - Fundamental
A runner-up concept for a recent competition in New York for a new liveable skyscraper, this concept from Fundamental makes the most of the compact 18 by 70 foot plot by cantilevering over its neighbouring buildings in a chaotic form that serves as a mid-level public lobby area. This lobby is described by its architects as a space that “merges concepts of living, playing and study. It serves as a hybrid machine for people of different preoccupations to meet and talk with each other, to have casual or arranged meetings. This space would convert the tower into a public venue for the community and the neighbourhood”
Technologically speaking, the building is a hub of modern thinking; with deep columns stretching all the way up the superstructure to support the building’s weight, and a north-facing facade that catches and filters the wind for passive ventilation. At the narrow base the building would be accessed by elevators. 
See more at: ArchDaily
Zoom Info
New York Tomorrow - Fundamental
A runner-up concept for a recent competition in New York for a new liveable skyscraper, this concept from Fundamental makes the most of the compact 18 by 70 foot plot by cantilevering over its neighbouring buildings in a chaotic form that serves as a mid-level public lobby area. This lobby is described by its architects as a space that “merges concepts of living, playing and study. It serves as a hybrid machine for people of different preoccupations to meet and talk with each other, to have casual or arranged meetings. This space would convert the tower into a public venue for the community and the neighbourhood”
Technologically speaking, the building is a hub of modern thinking; with deep columns stretching all the way up the superstructure to support the building’s weight, and a north-facing facade that catches and filters the wind for passive ventilation. At the narrow base the building would be accessed by elevators. 
See more at: ArchDaily
Zoom Info
New York Tomorrow - Fundamental
A runner-up concept for a recent competition in New York for a new liveable skyscraper, this concept from Fundamental makes the most of the compact 18 by 70 foot plot by cantilevering over its neighbouring buildings in a chaotic form that serves as a mid-level public lobby area. This lobby is described by its architects as a space that “merges concepts of living, playing and study. It serves as a hybrid machine for people of different preoccupations to meet and talk with each other, to have casual or arranged meetings. This space would convert the tower into a public venue for the community and the neighbourhood”
Technologically speaking, the building is a hub of modern thinking; with deep columns stretching all the way up the superstructure to support the building’s weight, and a north-facing facade that catches and filters the wind for passive ventilation. At the narrow base the building would be accessed by elevators. 
See more at: ArchDaily
Zoom Info
New York Tomorrow - Fundamental
A runner-up concept for a recent competition in New York for a new liveable skyscraper, this concept from Fundamental makes the most of the compact 18 by 70 foot plot by cantilevering over its neighbouring buildings in a chaotic form that serves as a mid-level public lobby area. This lobby is described by its architects as a space that “merges concepts of living, playing and study. It serves as a hybrid machine for people of different preoccupations to meet and talk with each other, to have casual or arranged meetings. This space would convert the tower into a public venue for the community and the neighbourhood”
Technologically speaking, the building is a hub of modern thinking; with deep columns stretching all the way up the superstructure to support the building’s weight, and a north-facing facade that catches and filters the wind for passive ventilation. At the narrow base the building would be accessed by elevators. 
See more at: ArchDaily
Zoom Info

New York Tomorrow - Fundamental

A runner-up concept for a recent competition in New York for a new liveable skyscraper, this concept from Fundamental makes the most of the compact 18 by 70 foot plot by cantilevering over its neighbouring buildings in a chaotic form that serves as a mid-level public lobby area. This lobby is described by its architects as a space that merges concepts of living, playing and study. It serves as a hybrid machine for people of different preoccupations to meet and talk with each other, to have casual or arranged meetings. This space would convert the tower into a public venue for the community and the neighbourhood”

Technologically speaking, the building is a hub of modern thinking; with deep columns stretching all the way up the superstructure to support the building’s weight, and a north-facing facade that catches and filters the wind for passive ventilation. At the narrow base the building would be accessed by elevators. 

See more at: ArchDaily

Human Harp - Di Mainstone

Having seen the physical relationship between suspension bridges and string instruments - both featuring cables (or strings) held under tension - London-based artist Di Mainstone created the Human Harp; a parasitic instrument that can be connected to such structures (seen above installed atop the Brooklyn Bridge in New York) wherein a user can manipulate the strings with the movements of their own body to produce sounds that are interpreted by a computer. Right now the sounds are pre-loaded on the computer, but in the future the artist hopes to produce custom noises using the harp. 

See more at: DesignBoom

Japanese artist Aki Inomata 3D prints homes for hermit crabs
These beautiful plastic shells feature miniature versions of cities and structures from around the world including New York, Thailand and Greece. Hermit crabs usually inhabit empty snail shells but have been known to opt for wood or whatever they can scavenge when shells aren’t to be found. Inomata decided to play on this activity by printing these forms and leaving them for the crabs to find. The series is rather aptly titled: “Why Not Hand Over a ‘Shelter’ to Hermit Crabs?”.
The work is reminiscent of the art produced when Caddisfly larvae where given gold leaf to make protective cases from, which you can see here at: Laughing Squid
Images sourced from: Bored Panda
Zoom Info
Japanese artist Aki Inomata 3D prints homes for hermit crabs
These beautiful plastic shells feature miniature versions of cities and structures from around the world including New York, Thailand and Greece. Hermit crabs usually inhabit empty snail shells but have been known to opt for wood or whatever they can scavenge when shells aren’t to be found. Inomata decided to play on this activity by printing these forms and leaving them for the crabs to find. The series is rather aptly titled: “Why Not Hand Over a ‘Shelter’ to Hermit Crabs?”.
The work is reminiscent of the art produced when Caddisfly larvae where given gold leaf to make protective cases from, which you can see here at: Laughing Squid
Images sourced from: Bored Panda
Zoom Info
Japanese artist Aki Inomata 3D prints homes for hermit crabs
These beautiful plastic shells feature miniature versions of cities and structures from around the world including New York, Thailand and Greece. Hermit crabs usually inhabit empty snail shells but have been known to opt for wood or whatever they can scavenge when shells aren’t to be found. Inomata decided to play on this activity by printing these forms and leaving them for the crabs to find. The series is rather aptly titled: “Why Not Hand Over a ‘Shelter’ to Hermit Crabs?”.
The work is reminiscent of the art produced when Caddisfly larvae where given gold leaf to make protective cases from, which you can see here at: Laughing Squid
Images sourced from: Bored Panda
Zoom Info
Japanese artist Aki Inomata 3D prints homes for hermit crabs
These beautiful plastic shells feature miniature versions of cities and structures from around the world including New York, Thailand and Greece. Hermit crabs usually inhabit empty snail shells but have been known to opt for wood or whatever they can scavenge when shells aren’t to be found. Inomata decided to play on this activity by printing these forms and leaving them for the crabs to find. The series is rather aptly titled: “Why Not Hand Over a ‘Shelter’ to Hermit Crabs?”.
The work is reminiscent of the art produced when Caddisfly larvae where given gold leaf to make protective cases from, which you can see here at: Laughing Squid
Images sourced from: Bored Panda
Zoom Info
Japanese artist Aki Inomata 3D prints homes for hermit crabs
These beautiful plastic shells feature miniature versions of cities and structures from around the world including New York, Thailand and Greece. Hermit crabs usually inhabit empty snail shells but have been known to opt for wood or whatever they can scavenge when shells aren’t to be found. Inomata decided to play on this activity by printing these forms and leaving them for the crabs to find. The series is rather aptly titled: “Why Not Hand Over a ‘Shelter’ to Hermit Crabs?”.
The work is reminiscent of the art produced when Caddisfly larvae where given gold leaf to make protective cases from, which you can see here at: Laughing Squid
Images sourced from: Bored Panda
Zoom Info
Japanese artist Aki Inomata 3D prints homes for hermit crabs
These beautiful plastic shells feature miniature versions of cities and structures from around the world including New York, Thailand and Greece. Hermit crabs usually inhabit empty snail shells but have been known to opt for wood or whatever they can scavenge when shells aren’t to be found. Inomata decided to play on this activity by printing these forms and leaving them for the crabs to find. The series is rather aptly titled: “Why Not Hand Over a ‘Shelter’ to Hermit Crabs?”.
The work is reminiscent of the art produced when Caddisfly larvae where given gold leaf to make protective cases from, which you can see here at: Laughing Squid
Images sourced from: Bored Panda
Zoom Info

Japanese artist Aki Inomata 3D prints homes for hermit crabs

These beautiful plastic shells feature miniature versions of cities and structures from around the world including New York, Thailand and Greece. Hermit crabs usually inhabit empty snail shells but have been known to opt for wood or whatever they can scavenge when shells aren’t to be found. Inomata decided to play on this activity by printing these forms and leaving them for the crabs to find. The series is rather aptly titled: “Why Not Hand Over a ‘Shelter’ to Hermit Crabs?”.

The work is reminiscent of the art produced when Caddisfly larvae where given gold leaf to make protective cases from, which you can see here at: Laughing Squid

Images sourced from: Bored Panda

Staircase from Department SDM - Architecture in Motion Workshop
Anyone who is a regular to this page will know I love staircases, and this flowing walnut example is a fantastic spin on the traditional cantilever frame staircase. Rather than featuring simple beams jutting out from the wall that rest freestanding in the air, these forms curve up and over to make up a complete, interconnected set of steps. The staircase can be seen from almost every part of the property; making it a focal point and ‘articulator of spaces’. 
See more of the property at: Platforma Arquitectura
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Staircase from Department SDM - Architecture in Motion Workshop
Anyone who is a regular to this page will know I love staircases, and this flowing walnut example is a fantastic spin on the traditional cantilever frame staircase. Rather than featuring simple beams jutting out from the wall that rest freestanding in the air, these forms curve up and over to make up a complete, interconnected set of steps. The staircase can be seen from almost every part of the property; making it a focal point and ‘articulator of spaces’. 
See more of the property at: Platforma Arquitectura
Zoom Info
Staircase from Department SDM - Architecture in Motion Workshop
Anyone who is a regular to this page will know I love staircases, and this flowing walnut example is a fantastic spin on the traditional cantilever frame staircase. Rather than featuring simple beams jutting out from the wall that rest freestanding in the air, these forms curve up and over to make up a complete, interconnected set of steps. The staircase can be seen from almost every part of the property; making it a focal point and ‘articulator of spaces’. 
See more of the property at: Platforma Arquitectura
Zoom Info
Staircase from Department SDM - Architecture in Motion Workshop
Anyone who is a regular to this page will know I love staircases, and this flowing walnut example is a fantastic spin on the traditional cantilever frame staircase. Rather than featuring simple beams jutting out from the wall that rest freestanding in the air, these forms curve up and over to make up a complete, interconnected set of steps. The staircase can be seen from almost every part of the property; making it a focal point and ‘articulator of spaces’. 
See more of the property at: Platforma Arquitectura
Zoom Info

Staircase from Department SDM - Architecture in Motion Workshop

Anyone who is a regular to this page will know I love staircases, and this flowing walnut example is a fantastic spin on the traditional cantilever frame staircase. Rather than featuring simple beams jutting out from the wall that rest freestanding in the air, these forms curve up and over to make up a complete, interconnected set of steps. The staircase can be seen from almost every part of the property; making it a focal point and ‘articulator of spaces’. 

See more of the property at: Platforma Arquitectura

Honourable mentions from the recent AC-CA ‘Paris-10’ architecture competition, Paris
This competition tasked designers to create a concept for a riverside champagne bar in Paris. There were three winners each receiving a split of a $6,000 prize, plus these 7 honourable mentions. Top to bottom they are:
1. Urban Stage - Frank Dittel, Andreas Blodow, Vera Kolblin, Belinda Pradella 
2. Bar-Las-Ile - Szymon Nowakowski, Jedrzej Pawlaczyk, Dorota Piechocinska
3. Floating Champagne Bar - Alan Lau, Sand Helsel, Vivian Johnny
4. Pariscope - Kwang Min Lee, Jae Hyun Kim, Hyung Gyu Kim, Kenny Kim
5. Beyond The River - Luiz Eduardo Lupatini
6. Champagne Bar - Hideaki Nishimura
7. Bottle_Encore - Oliwia Stachowska, Anna Sokalska
-
Sourced from: ArchiScene
See the winning entries at: AC-CA
Zoom Info
Honourable mentions from the recent AC-CA ‘Paris-10’ architecture competition, Paris
This competition tasked designers to create a concept for a riverside champagne bar in Paris. There were three winners each receiving a split of a $6,000 prize, plus these 7 honourable mentions. Top to bottom they are:
1. Urban Stage - Frank Dittel, Andreas Blodow, Vera Kolblin, Belinda Pradella 
2. Bar-Las-Ile - Szymon Nowakowski, Jedrzej Pawlaczyk, Dorota Piechocinska
3. Floating Champagne Bar - Alan Lau, Sand Helsel, Vivian Johnny
4. Pariscope - Kwang Min Lee, Jae Hyun Kim, Hyung Gyu Kim, Kenny Kim
5. Beyond The River - Luiz Eduardo Lupatini
6. Champagne Bar - Hideaki Nishimura
7. Bottle_Encore - Oliwia Stachowska, Anna Sokalska
-
Sourced from: ArchiScene
See the winning entries at: AC-CA
Zoom Info
Honourable mentions from the recent AC-CA ‘Paris-10’ architecture competition, Paris
This competition tasked designers to create a concept for a riverside champagne bar in Paris. There were three winners each receiving a split of a $6,000 prize, plus these 7 honourable mentions. Top to bottom they are:
1. Urban Stage - Frank Dittel, Andreas Blodow, Vera Kolblin, Belinda Pradella 
2. Bar-Las-Ile - Szymon Nowakowski, Jedrzej Pawlaczyk, Dorota Piechocinska
3. Floating Champagne Bar - Alan Lau, Sand Helsel, Vivian Johnny
4. Pariscope - Kwang Min Lee, Jae Hyun Kim, Hyung Gyu Kim, Kenny Kim
5. Beyond The River - Luiz Eduardo Lupatini
6. Champagne Bar - Hideaki Nishimura
7. Bottle_Encore - Oliwia Stachowska, Anna Sokalska
-
Sourced from: ArchiScene
See the winning entries at: AC-CA
Zoom Info
Honourable mentions from the recent AC-CA ‘Paris-10’ architecture competition, Paris
This competition tasked designers to create a concept for a riverside champagne bar in Paris. There were three winners each receiving a split of a $6,000 prize, plus these 7 honourable mentions. Top to bottom they are:
1. Urban Stage - Frank Dittel, Andreas Blodow, Vera Kolblin, Belinda Pradella 
2. Bar-Las-Ile - Szymon Nowakowski, Jedrzej Pawlaczyk, Dorota Piechocinska
3. Floating Champagne Bar - Alan Lau, Sand Helsel, Vivian Johnny
4. Pariscope - Kwang Min Lee, Jae Hyun Kim, Hyung Gyu Kim, Kenny Kim
5. Beyond The River - Luiz Eduardo Lupatini
6. Champagne Bar - Hideaki Nishimura
7. Bottle_Encore - Oliwia Stachowska, Anna Sokalska
-
Sourced from: ArchiScene
See the winning entries at: AC-CA
Zoom Info
Honourable mentions from the recent AC-CA ‘Paris-10’ architecture competition, Paris
This competition tasked designers to create a concept for a riverside champagne bar in Paris. There were three winners each receiving a split of a $6,000 prize, plus these 7 honourable mentions. Top to bottom they are:
1. Urban Stage - Frank Dittel, Andreas Blodow, Vera Kolblin, Belinda Pradella 
2. Bar-Las-Ile - Szymon Nowakowski, Jedrzej Pawlaczyk, Dorota Piechocinska
3. Floating Champagne Bar - Alan Lau, Sand Helsel, Vivian Johnny
4. Pariscope - Kwang Min Lee, Jae Hyun Kim, Hyung Gyu Kim, Kenny Kim
5. Beyond The River - Luiz Eduardo Lupatini
6. Champagne Bar - Hideaki Nishimura
7. Bottle_Encore - Oliwia Stachowska, Anna Sokalska
-
Sourced from: ArchiScene
See the winning entries at: AC-CA
Zoom Info
Honourable mentions from the recent AC-CA ‘Paris-10’ architecture competition, Paris
This competition tasked designers to create a concept for a riverside champagne bar in Paris. There were three winners each receiving a split of a $6,000 prize, plus these 7 honourable mentions. Top to bottom they are:
1. Urban Stage - Frank Dittel, Andreas Blodow, Vera Kolblin, Belinda Pradella 
2. Bar-Las-Ile - Szymon Nowakowski, Jedrzej Pawlaczyk, Dorota Piechocinska
3. Floating Champagne Bar - Alan Lau, Sand Helsel, Vivian Johnny
4. Pariscope - Kwang Min Lee, Jae Hyun Kim, Hyung Gyu Kim, Kenny Kim
5. Beyond The River - Luiz Eduardo Lupatini
6. Champagne Bar - Hideaki Nishimura
7. Bottle_Encore - Oliwia Stachowska, Anna Sokalska
-
Sourced from: ArchiScene
See the winning entries at: AC-CA
Zoom Info
Honourable mentions from the recent AC-CA ‘Paris-10’ architecture competition, Paris
This competition tasked designers to create a concept for a riverside champagne bar in Paris. There were three winners each receiving a split of a $6,000 prize, plus these 7 honourable mentions. Top to bottom they are:
1. Urban Stage - Frank Dittel, Andreas Blodow, Vera Kolblin, Belinda Pradella 
2. Bar-Las-Ile - Szymon Nowakowski, Jedrzej Pawlaczyk, Dorota Piechocinska
3. Floating Champagne Bar - Alan Lau, Sand Helsel, Vivian Johnny
4. Pariscope - Kwang Min Lee, Jae Hyun Kim, Hyung Gyu Kim, Kenny Kim
5. Beyond The River - Luiz Eduardo Lupatini
6. Champagne Bar - Hideaki Nishimura
7. Bottle_Encore - Oliwia Stachowska, Anna Sokalska
-
Sourced from: ArchiScene
See the winning entries at: AC-CA
Zoom Info

Honourable mentions from the recent AC-CA ‘Paris-10’ architecture competition, Paris

This competition tasked designers to create a concept for a riverside champagne bar in Paris. There were three winners each receiving a split of a $6,000 prize, plus these 7 honourable mentions. Top to bottom they are:

1. Urban Stage - Frank Dittel, Andreas Blodow, Vera Kolblin, Belinda Pradella 

2. Bar-Las-Ile - Szymon Nowakowski, Jedrzej Pawlaczyk, Dorota Piechocinska

3. Floating Champagne Bar - Alan Lau, Sand Helsel, Vivian Johnny

4. Pariscope - Kwang Min Lee, Jae Hyun Kim, Hyung Gyu Kim, Kenny Kim

5. Beyond The River - Luiz Eduardo Lupatini

6. Champagne Bar - Hideaki Nishimura

7. Bottle_Encore - Oliwia Stachowska, Anna Sokalska

-

Sourced from: ArchiScene

See the winning entries at: AC-CA

Unbalanced Hotel - OOIIO Architecture
This leaning ‘picture frame’ hotel concept leans precariously over the cliff face near Lima in Peru so as not to distract or dull the landscape but frame it instead. From afar it appears to have crashed into the rock like some kind of interstellar object. 
Sinking into the ground at one corner, the hotel would house 125 rooms, restaurants, conference rooms and exhibition spaces. By creating it with such an odd shape, OOIIO hope to produce not only a hotel, but a visual landmark that highlights itself and the area it is set in. 
Sourced from: Wired
Zoom Info
Unbalanced Hotel - OOIIO Architecture
This leaning ‘picture frame’ hotel concept leans precariously over the cliff face near Lima in Peru so as not to distract or dull the landscape but frame it instead. From afar it appears to have crashed into the rock like some kind of interstellar object. 
Sinking into the ground at one corner, the hotel would house 125 rooms, restaurants, conference rooms and exhibition spaces. By creating it with such an odd shape, OOIIO hope to produce not only a hotel, but a visual landmark that highlights itself and the area it is set in. 
Sourced from: Wired
Zoom Info
Unbalanced Hotel - OOIIO Architecture
This leaning ‘picture frame’ hotel concept leans precariously over the cliff face near Lima in Peru so as not to distract or dull the landscape but frame it instead. From afar it appears to have crashed into the rock like some kind of interstellar object. 
Sinking into the ground at one corner, the hotel would house 125 rooms, restaurants, conference rooms and exhibition spaces. By creating it with such an odd shape, OOIIO hope to produce not only a hotel, but a visual landmark that highlights itself and the area it is set in. 
Sourced from: Wired
Zoom Info
Unbalanced Hotel - OOIIO Architecture
This leaning ‘picture frame’ hotel concept leans precariously over the cliff face near Lima in Peru so as not to distract or dull the landscape but frame it instead. From afar it appears to have crashed into the rock like some kind of interstellar object. 
Sinking into the ground at one corner, the hotel would house 125 rooms, restaurants, conference rooms and exhibition spaces. By creating it with such an odd shape, OOIIO hope to produce not only a hotel, but a visual landmark that highlights itself and the area it is set in. 
Sourced from: Wired
Zoom Info
Unbalanced Hotel - OOIIO Architecture
This leaning ‘picture frame’ hotel concept leans precariously over the cliff face near Lima in Peru so as not to distract or dull the landscape but frame it instead. From afar it appears to have crashed into the rock like some kind of interstellar object. 
Sinking into the ground at one corner, the hotel would house 125 rooms, restaurants, conference rooms and exhibition spaces. By creating it with such an odd shape, OOIIO hope to produce not only a hotel, but a visual landmark that highlights itself and the area it is set in. 
Sourced from: Wired
Zoom Info
Unbalanced Hotel - OOIIO Architecture
This leaning ‘picture frame’ hotel concept leans precariously over the cliff face near Lima in Peru so as not to distract or dull the landscape but frame it instead. From afar it appears to have crashed into the rock like some kind of interstellar object. 
Sinking into the ground at one corner, the hotel would house 125 rooms, restaurants, conference rooms and exhibition spaces. By creating it with such an odd shape, OOIIO hope to produce not only a hotel, but a visual landmark that highlights itself and the area it is set in. 
Sourced from: Wired
Zoom Info
Unbalanced Hotel - OOIIO Architecture
This leaning ‘picture frame’ hotel concept leans precariously over the cliff face near Lima in Peru so as not to distract or dull the landscape but frame it instead. From afar it appears to have crashed into the rock like some kind of interstellar object. 
Sinking into the ground at one corner, the hotel would house 125 rooms, restaurants, conference rooms and exhibition spaces. By creating it with such an odd shape, OOIIO hope to produce not only a hotel, but a visual landmark that highlights itself and the area it is set in. 
Sourced from: Wired
Zoom Info

Unbalanced Hotel - OOIIO Architecture

This leaning ‘picture frame’ hotel concept leans precariously over the cliff face near Lima in Peru so as not to distract or dull the landscape but frame it instead. From afar it appears to have crashed into the rock like some kind of interstellar object. 

Sinking into the ground at one corner, the hotel would house 125 rooms, restaurants, conference rooms and exhibition spaces. By creating it with such an odd shape, OOIIO hope to produce not only a hotel, but a visual landmark that highlights itself and the area it is set in. 

Sourced from: Wired