Air - THE UNSEEN Studio
London-based studio THE UNSEEN have produced clothing utilising wind-reactive ink that changes its colour in different conditions. Titled ‘Air’, these chameleonic garments are seen as a means of translating ‘the otherwise unseen turbulence surrounding the human as it goes about its environment’ and are a melding of science and fashion.
See more at: See THE UNSEEN
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Air - THE UNSEEN Studio
London-based studio THE UNSEEN have produced clothing utilising wind-reactive ink that changes its colour in different conditions. Titled ‘Air’, these chameleonic garments are seen as a means of translating ‘the otherwise unseen turbulence surrounding the human as it goes about its environment’ and are a melding of science and fashion.
See more at: See THE UNSEEN
Zoom Info
Air - THE UNSEEN Studio
London-based studio THE UNSEEN have produced clothing utilising wind-reactive ink that changes its colour in different conditions. Titled ‘Air’, these chameleonic garments are seen as a means of translating ‘the otherwise unseen turbulence surrounding the human as it goes about its environment’ and are a melding of science and fashion.
See more at: See THE UNSEEN
Zoom Info
Air - THE UNSEEN Studio
London-based studio THE UNSEEN have produced clothing utilising wind-reactive ink that changes its colour in different conditions. Titled ‘Air’, these chameleonic garments are seen as a means of translating ‘the otherwise unseen turbulence surrounding the human as it goes about its environment’ and are a melding of science and fashion.
See more at: See THE UNSEEN
Zoom Info
Air - THE UNSEEN Studio
London-based studio THE UNSEEN have produced clothing utilising wind-reactive ink that changes its colour in different conditions. Titled ‘Air’, these chameleonic garments are seen as a means of translating ‘the otherwise unseen turbulence surrounding the human as it goes about its environment’ and are a melding of science and fashion.
See more at: See THE UNSEEN
Zoom Info
Air - THE UNSEEN Studio
London-based studio THE UNSEEN have produced clothing utilising wind-reactive ink that changes its colour in different conditions. Titled ‘Air’, these chameleonic garments are seen as a means of translating ‘the otherwise unseen turbulence surrounding the human as it goes about its environment’ and are a melding of science and fashion.
See more at: See THE UNSEEN
Zoom Info

Air - THE UNSEEN Studio

London-based studio THE UNSEEN have produced clothing utilising wind-reactive ink that changes its colour in different conditions. Titled ‘Air’, these chameleonic garments are seen as a means of translating ‘the otherwise unseen turbulence surrounding the human as it goes about its environment’ and are a melding of science and fashion.

See more at: See THE UNSEEN

Genetically modified bees could produce buildings from concrete honey!
The idea may sound ridiculous, but the brainchild of Geoff Manaugh (ex-editor of Gizmodo magazine) and friend John Becker is an utterly fascinating proposal for how we might produce architecture in the future. Their idea would be to initially place genetically engineered bees in damaged structures to work as ‘printheads’ on repair work (their honeycombs fusing together the cracks) but later imagine whole buildings being produced in this way from scratch in a similar fashion to MITs pavilion woven by silkworms.
"The ultimate goal would be to produce entire, free-standing architectural forms, but, in the meantime, the bees would be able to construct or repair statuary, architectural ornament, building details and more"
While it may be a bit mad, I for one believe that’s what architecture needs sometimes to move forward. This would certainly make for some exciting forms if the pair’s initial concept renders are anything to go by. 
See more at: Dezeen
Zoom Info
Genetically modified bees could produce buildings from concrete honey!
The idea may sound ridiculous, but the brainchild of Geoff Manaugh (ex-editor of Gizmodo magazine) and friend John Becker is an utterly fascinating proposal for how we might produce architecture in the future. Their idea would be to initially place genetically engineered bees in damaged structures to work as ‘printheads’ on repair work (their honeycombs fusing together the cracks) but later imagine whole buildings being produced in this way from scratch in a similar fashion to MITs pavilion woven by silkworms.
"The ultimate goal would be to produce entire, free-standing architectural forms, but, in the meantime, the bees would be able to construct or repair statuary, architectural ornament, building details and more"
While it may be a bit mad, I for one believe that’s what architecture needs sometimes to move forward. This would certainly make for some exciting forms if the pair’s initial concept renders are anything to go by. 
See more at: Dezeen
Zoom Info
Genetically modified bees could produce buildings from concrete honey!
The idea may sound ridiculous, but the brainchild of Geoff Manaugh (ex-editor of Gizmodo magazine) and friend John Becker is an utterly fascinating proposal for how we might produce architecture in the future. Their idea would be to initially place genetically engineered bees in damaged structures to work as ‘printheads’ on repair work (their honeycombs fusing together the cracks) but later imagine whole buildings being produced in this way from scratch in a similar fashion to MITs pavilion woven by silkworms.
"The ultimate goal would be to produce entire, free-standing architectural forms, but, in the meantime, the bees would be able to construct or repair statuary, architectural ornament, building details and more"
While it may be a bit mad, I for one believe that’s what architecture needs sometimes to move forward. This would certainly make for some exciting forms if the pair’s initial concept renders are anything to go by. 
See more at: Dezeen
Zoom Info

Genetically modified bees could produce buildings from concrete honey!

The idea may sound ridiculous, but the brainchild of Geoff Manaugh (ex-editor of Gizmodo magazine) and friend John Becker is an utterly fascinating proposal for how we might produce architecture in the future. Their idea would be to initially place genetically engineered bees in damaged structures to work as ‘printheads’ on repair work (their honeycombs fusing together the cracks) but later imagine whole buildings being produced in this way from scratch in a similar fashion to MITs pavilion woven by silkworms.

"The ultimate goal would be to produce entire, free-standing architectural forms, but, in the meantime, the bees would be able to construct or repair statuary, architectural ornament, building details and more"

While it may be a bit mad, I for one believe that’s what architecture needs sometimes to move forward. This would certainly make for some exciting forms if the pair’s initial concept renders are anything to go by. 

See more at: Dezeen

Silk Leaf - Julian Melchiorri

The latest video in Dezeen’s fascinating collaboration with MINI Frontiers, this project involves the creation of artificially produced leaves. These biological structures breathe and produce oxygen just as naturally-grown leaves do, and could pave the way toward eco facades for our buildings as seen in so many renders nowadays, or could be utilised by NASA to allow for wider space exploration as a way of maintaining oxygen aboard spacecraft.  

Explosion Cabinet, Look-Again Collection - Sebastian Errazuriz
With just a few simple pulls, this simple-looking maple wood cabinet quickly ‘explodes’ into a complex geometric form; with a single central seam that beckons the touch of the user. In moments the intricate series of rails slide apart and reveal the true nature of the product.
"A beautiful, surprising, and confounding work that represents the playful conceit of the master cabinet maker showing off" - Rachel Delphia, exhibition curator.
See more at: DesignBoom
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Explosion Cabinet, Look-Again Collection - Sebastian Errazuriz
With just a few simple pulls, this simple-looking maple wood cabinet quickly ‘explodes’ into a complex geometric form; with a single central seam that beckons the touch of the user. In moments the intricate series of rails slide apart and reveal the true nature of the product.
"A beautiful, surprising, and confounding work that represents the playful conceit of the master cabinet maker showing off" - Rachel Delphia, exhibition curator.
See more at: DesignBoom
Zoom Info
Explosion Cabinet, Look-Again Collection - Sebastian Errazuriz
With just a few simple pulls, this simple-looking maple wood cabinet quickly ‘explodes’ into a complex geometric form; with a single central seam that beckons the touch of the user. In moments the intricate series of rails slide apart and reveal the true nature of the product.
"A beautiful, surprising, and confounding work that represents the playful conceit of the master cabinet maker showing off" - Rachel Delphia, exhibition curator.
See more at: DesignBoom
Zoom Info
Explosion Cabinet, Look-Again Collection - Sebastian Errazuriz
With just a few simple pulls, this simple-looking maple wood cabinet quickly ‘explodes’ into a complex geometric form; with a single central seam that beckons the touch of the user. In moments the intricate series of rails slide apart and reveal the true nature of the product.
"A beautiful, surprising, and confounding work that represents the playful conceit of the master cabinet maker showing off" - Rachel Delphia, exhibition curator.
See more at: DesignBoom
Zoom Info
Explosion Cabinet, Look-Again Collection - Sebastian Errazuriz
With just a few simple pulls, this simple-looking maple wood cabinet quickly ‘explodes’ into a complex geometric form; with a single central seam that beckons the touch of the user. In moments the intricate series of rails slide apart and reveal the true nature of the product.
"A beautiful, surprising, and confounding work that represents the playful conceit of the master cabinet maker showing off" - Rachel Delphia, exhibition curator.
See more at: DesignBoom
Zoom Info
Explosion Cabinet, Look-Again Collection - Sebastian Errazuriz
With just a few simple pulls, this simple-looking maple wood cabinet quickly ‘explodes’ into a complex geometric form; with a single central seam that beckons the touch of the user. In moments the intricate series of rails slide apart and reveal the true nature of the product.
"A beautiful, surprising, and confounding work that represents the playful conceit of the master cabinet maker showing off" - Rachel Delphia, exhibition curator.
See more at: DesignBoom
Zoom Info

Explosion Cabinet, Look-Again Collection - Sebastian Errazuriz

With just a few simple pulls, this simple-looking maple wood cabinet quickly ‘explodes’ into a complex geometric form; with a single central seam that beckons the touch of the user. In moments the intricate series of rails slide apart and reveal the true nature of the product.

"A beautiful, surprising, and confounding work that represents the playful conceit of the master cabinet maker showing off" - Rachel Delphia, exhibition curator.

See more at: DesignBoom

Primeval Symbiosis: Single Pole House - Konrad Wójcik
A special mention project in the 2013 D3 Natural Systems International Architectural Design Competition, this interesting proposal for compact living spaces pictures a response to mankind’s ‘slaughter’ of the natural world and instead attempts to achieve symbiosis with it. Trees, it says, are the perfect living sculpture… and these single pole structures are designed to emulate them. They have next to no impact on their surroundings, they gather energy from the sun and harvest water in order to survive.
With designs like this in place, urban expansion becomes possible without deforestation or implementation of harmful infrastructure. They can be built near to existing roads and can be spaced far enough apart that each unit is invisible to the next. 
See more at: Behance
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Primeval Symbiosis: Single Pole House - Konrad Wójcik
A special mention project in the 2013 D3 Natural Systems International Architectural Design Competition, this interesting proposal for compact living spaces pictures a response to mankind’s ‘slaughter’ of the natural world and instead attempts to achieve symbiosis with it. Trees, it says, are the perfect living sculpture… and these single pole structures are designed to emulate them. They have next to no impact on their surroundings, they gather energy from the sun and harvest water in order to survive.
With designs like this in place, urban expansion becomes possible without deforestation or implementation of harmful infrastructure. They can be built near to existing roads and can be spaced far enough apart that each unit is invisible to the next. 
See more at: Behance
Zoom Info
Primeval Symbiosis: Single Pole House - Konrad Wójcik
A special mention project in the 2013 D3 Natural Systems International Architectural Design Competition, this interesting proposal for compact living spaces pictures a response to mankind’s ‘slaughter’ of the natural world and instead attempts to achieve symbiosis with it. Trees, it says, are the perfect living sculpture… and these single pole structures are designed to emulate them. They have next to no impact on their surroundings, they gather energy from the sun and harvest water in order to survive.
With designs like this in place, urban expansion becomes possible without deforestation or implementation of harmful infrastructure. They can be built near to existing roads and can be spaced far enough apart that each unit is invisible to the next. 
See more at: Behance
Zoom Info
Primeval Symbiosis: Single Pole House - Konrad Wójcik
A special mention project in the 2013 D3 Natural Systems International Architectural Design Competition, this interesting proposal for compact living spaces pictures a response to mankind’s ‘slaughter’ of the natural world and instead attempts to achieve symbiosis with it. Trees, it says, are the perfect living sculpture… and these single pole structures are designed to emulate them. They have next to no impact on their surroundings, they gather energy from the sun and harvest water in order to survive.
With designs like this in place, urban expansion becomes possible without deforestation or implementation of harmful infrastructure. They can be built near to existing roads and can be spaced far enough apart that each unit is invisible to the next. 
See more at: Behance
Zoom Info

Primeval Symbiosis: Single Pole House - Konrad Wójcik

A special mention project in the 2013 D3 Natural Systems International Architectural Design Competition, this interesting proposal for compact living spaces pictures a response to mankind’s ‘slaughter’ of the natural world and instead attempts to achieve symbiosis with it. Trees, it says, are the perfect living sculpture… and these single pole structures are designed to emulate them. They have next to no impact on their surroundings, they gather energy from the sun and harvest water in order to survive.

With designs like this in place, urban expansion becomes possible without deforestation or implementation of harmful infrastructure. They can be built near to existing roads and can be spaced far enough apart that each unit is invisible to the next. 

See more at: Behance

Allandale House - William O’Brien Jr
This wonderfully simple home is bathed in natural light that illuminates the minimal interior; drawing connections between the clean wood flooring and the natural forest backdrop seen outside. 
The A-frame cabin was designed for ‘an idiosyncratic connoisseur and her family’ and also houses a number of eccentric artefacts including wines, rare books and stuffed birds to name a few. The two asymmetrical A-frames lean against one another to form the various sections of the holiday home.
See more at: e-architect 
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Allandale House - William O’Brien Jr
This wonderfully simple home is bathed in natural light that illuminates the minimal interior; drawing connections between the clean wood flooring and the natural forest backdrop seen outside. 
The A-frame cabin was designed for ‘an idiosyncratic connoisseur and her family’ and also houses a number of eccentric artefacts including wines, rare books and stuffed birds to name a few. The two asymmetrical A-frames lean against one another to form the various sections of the holiday home.
See more at: e-architect 
Zoom Info
Allandale House - William O’Brien Jr
This wonderfully simple home is bathed in natural light that illuminates the minimal interior; drawing connections between the clean wood flooring and the natural forest backdrop seen outside. 
The A-frame cabin was designed for ‘an idiosyncratic connoisseur and her family’ and also houses a number of eccentric artefacts including wines, rare books and stuffed birds to name a few. The two asymmetrical A-frames lean against one another to form the various sections of the holiday home.
See more at: e-architect 
Zoom Info
Allandale House - William O’Brien Jr
This wonderfully simple home is bathed in natural light that illuminates the minimal interior; drawing connections between the clean wood flooring and the natural forest backdrop seen outside. 
The A-frame cabin was designed for ‘an idiosyncratic connoisseur and her family’ and also houses a number of eccentric artefacts including wines, rare books and stuffed birds to name a few. The two asymmetrical A-frames lean against one another to form the various sections of the holiday home.
See more at: e-architect 
Zoom Info
Allandale House - William O’Brien Jr
This wonderfully simple home is bathed in natural light that illuminates the minimal interior; drawing connections between the clean wood flooring and the natural forest backdrop seen outside. 
The A-frame cabin was designed for ‘an idiosyncratic connoisseur and her family’ and also houses a number of eccentric artefacts including wines, rare books and stuffed birds to name a few. The two asymmetrical A-frames lean against one another to form the various sections of the holiday home.
See more at: e-architect 
Zoom Info
Allandale House - William O’Brien Jr
This wonderfully simple home is bathed in natural light that illuminates the minimal interior; drawing connections between the clean wood flooring and the natural forest backdrop seen outside. 
The A-frame cabin was designed for ‘an idiosyncratic connoisseur and her family’ and also houses a number of eccentric artefacts including wines, rare books and stuffed birds to name a few. The two asymmetrical A-frames lean against one another to form the various sections of the holiday home.
See more at: e-architect 
Zoom Info

Allandale House - William O’Brien Jr

This wonderfully simple home is bathed in natural light that illuminates the minimal interior; drawing connections between the clean wood flooring and the natural forest backdrop seen outside. 

The A-frame cabin was designed for ‘an idiosyncratic connoisseur and her family’ and also houses a number of eccentric artefacts including wines, rare books and stuffed birds to name a few. The two asymmetrical A-frames lean against one another to form the various sections of the holiday home.

See more at: e-architect 

HUSH, Sensory Concentration Spaces (SCS) - Freyja Sewell
Initially just felt cocoons designed to provide comfortable places for rest, work or somewhere to nap (see first three images above), Freyja Sewell’s HUSH pods have since evolved into far more complex creatures.
The evolved HUSH pods are now seen by the designer as “sensory concentration spaces” - soft microcosms that actively block outside noises and distractions while bathing the occupant in ambient light and gentle sounds via inbuilt iPads. Sewell has noted how modern society always seems to be glued to some kind of device or another, and seeks to help us better engage with our own bodies and senses. These pods are seen to provide a vital opportunity for escapism wherein the isolation can alter our moods into more relaxed, zen states. 
See more at: Design Milk
Zoom Info
HUSH, Sensory Concentration Spaces (SCS) - Freyja Sewell
Initially just felt cocoons designed to provide comfortable places for rest, work or somewhere to nap (see first three images above), Freyja Sewell’s HUSH pods have since evolved into far more complex creatures.
The evolved HUSH pods are now seen by the designer as “sensory concentration spaces” - soft microcosms that actively block outside noises and distractions while bathing the occupant in ambient light and gentle sounds via inbuilt iPads. Sewell has noted how modern society always seems to be glued to some kind of device or another, and seeks to help us better engage with our own bodies and senses. These pods are seen to provide a vital opportunity for escapism wherein the isolation can alter our moods into more relaxed, zen states. 
See more at: Design Milk
Zoom Info
HUSH, Sensory Concentration Spaces (SCS) - Freyja Sewell
Initially just felt cocoons designed to provide comfortable places for rest, work or somewhere to nap (see first three images above), Freyja Sewell’s HUSH pods have since evolved into far more complex creatures.
The evolved HUSH pods are now seen by the designer as “sensory concentration spaces” - soft microcosms that actively block outside noises and distractions while bathing the occupant in ambient light and gentle sounds via inbuilt iPads. Sewell has noted how modern society always seems to be glued to some kind of device or another, and seeks to help us better engage with our own bodies and senses. These pods are seen to provide a vital opportunity for escapism wherein the isolation can alter our moods into more relaxed, zen states. 
See more at: Design Milk
Zoom Info
HUSH, Sensory Concentration Spaces (SCS) - Freyja Sewell
Initially just felt cocoons designed to provide comfortable places for rest, work or somewhere to nap (see first three images above), Freyja Sewell’s HUSH pods have since evolved into far more complex creatures.
The evolved HUSH pods are now seen by the designer as “sensory concentration spaces” - soft microcosms that actively block outside noises and distractions while bathing the occupant in ambient light and gentle sounds via inbuilt iPads. Sewell has noted how modern society always seems to be glued to some kind of device or another, and seeks to help us better engage with our own bodies and senses. These pods are seen to provide a vital opportunity for escapism wherein the isolation can alter our moods into more relaxed, zen states. 
See more at: Design Milk
Zoom Info
HUSH, Sensory Concentration Spaces (SCS) - Freyja Sewell
Initially just felt cocoons designed to provide comfortable places for rest, work or somewhere to nap (see first three images above), Freyja Sewell’s HUSH pods have since evolved into far more complex creatures.
The evolved HUSH pods are now seen by the designer as “sensory concentration spaces” - soft microcosms that actively block outside noises and distractions while bathing the occupant in ambient light and gentle sounds via inbuilt iPads. Sewell has noted how modern society always seems to be glued to some kind of device or another, and seeks to help us better engage with our own bodies and senses. These pods are seen to provide a vital opportunity for escapism wherein the isolation can alter our moods into more relaxed, zen states. 
See more at: Design Milk
Zoom Info
HUSH, Sensory Concentration Spaces (SCS) - Freyja Sewell
Initially just felt cocoons designed to provide comfortable places for rest, work or somewhere to nap (see first three images above), Freyja Sewell’s HUSH pods have since evolved into far more complex creatures.
The evolved HUSH pods are now seen by the designer as “sensory concentration spaces” - soft microcosms that actively block outside noises and distractions while bathing the occupant in ambient light and gentle sounds via inbuilt iPads. Sewell has noted how modern society always seems to be glued to some kind of device or another, and seeks to help us better engage with our own bodies and senses. These pods are seen to provide a vital opportunity for escapism wherein the isolation can alter our moods into more relaxed, zen states. 
See more at: Design Milk
Zoom Info
HUSH, Sensory Concentration Spaces (SCS) - Freyja Sewell
Initially just felt cocoons designed to provide comfortable places for rest, work or somewhere to nap (see first three images above), Freyja Sewell’s HUSH pods have since evolved into far more complex creatures.
The evolved HUSH pods are now seen by the designer as “sensory concentration spaces” - soft microcosms that actively block outside noises and distractions while bathing the occupant in ambient light and gentle sounds via inbuilt iPads. Sewell has noted how modern society always seems to be glued to some kind of device or another, and seeks to help us better engage with our own bodies and senses. These pods are seen to provide a vital opportunity for escapism wherein the isolation can alter our moods into more relaxed, zen states. 
See more at: Design Milk
Zoom Info
HUSH, Sensory Concentration Spaces (SCS) - Freyja Sewell
Initially just felt cocoons designed to provide comfortable places for rest, work or somewhere to nap (see first three images above), Freyja Sewell’s HUSH pods have since evolved into far more complex creatures.
The evolved HUSH pods are now seen by the designer as “sensory concentration spaces” - soft microcosms that actively block outside noises and distractions while bathing the occupant in ambient light and gentle sounds via inbuilt iPads. Sewell has noted how modern society always seems to be glued to some kind of device or another, and seeks to help us better engage with our own bodies and senses. These pods are seen to provide a vital opportunity for escapism wherein the isolation can alter our moods into more relaxed, zen states. 
See more at: Design Milk
Zoom Info

HUSH, Sensory Concentration Spaces (SCS) - Freyja Sewell

Initially just felt cocoons designed to provide comfortable places for rest, work or somewhere to nap (see first three images above), Freyja Sewell’s HUSH pods have since evolved into far more complex creatures.

The evolved HUSH pods are now seen by the designer as “sensory concentration spaces” - soft microcosms that actively block outside noises and distractions while bathing the occupant in ambient light and gentle sounds via inbuilt iPads. Sewell has noted how modern society always seems to be glued to some kind of device or another, and seeks to help us better engage with our own bodies and senses. These pods are seen to provide a vital opportunity for escapism wherein the isolation can alter our moods into more relaxed, zen states. 

See more at: Design Milk

Proposal for Casablanca Sustainable Market Square - Nikolova/Aarsø
This competition entry from a couple years ago is a brings together modern architectural thinking with classical Islamic traditions - creating a canopy structure that subtly re-imagines the star-and-polygon patterning of traditional Islamic buildings. The tree-like structures would protect from the harsh climate, while also working to collect rainwater that is collected in basins for use cleaning the market stalls at the end of the day. The canopy is also designed to become transparent at night; revealing the complex wood elements of the structure. Integrated smart-glass also produces energy gained through sunlight that operates mobile phone charging stations littered across the square.
See more at: Archdaily
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Proposal for Casablanca Sustainable Market Square - Nikolova/Aarsø
This competition entry from a couple years ago is a brings together modern architectural thinking with classical Islamic traditions - creating a canopy structure that subtly re-imagines the star-and-polygon patterning of traditional Islamic buildings. The tree-like structures would protect from the harsh climate, while also working to collect rainwater that is collected in basins for use cleaning the market stalls at the end of the day. The canopy is also designed to become transparent at night; revealing the complex wood elements of the structure. Integrated smart-glass also produces energy gained through sunlight that operates mobile phone charging stations littered across the square.
See more at: Archdaily
Zoom Info
Proposal for Casablanca Sustainable Market Square - Nikolova/Aarsø
This competition entry from a couple years ago is a brings together modern architectural thinking with classical Islamic traditions - creating a canopy structure that subtly re-imagines the star-and-polygon patterning of traditional Islamic buildings. The tree-like structures would protect from the harsh climate, while also working to collect rainwater that is collected in basins for use cleaning the market stalls at the end of the day. The canopy is also designed to become transparent at night; revealing the complex wood elements of the structure. Integrated smart-glass also produces energy gained through sunlight that operates mobile phone charging stations littered across the square.
See more at: Archdaily
Zoom Info
Proposal for Casablanca Sustainable Market Square - Nikolova/Aarsø
This competition entry from a couple years ago is a brings together modern architectural thinking with classical Islamic traditions - creating a canopy structure that subtly re-imagines the star-and-polygon patterning of traditional Islamic buildings. The tree-like structures would protect from the harsh climate, while also working to collect rainwater that is collected in basins for use cleaning the market stalls at the end of the day. The canopy is also designed to become transparent at night; revealing the complex wood elements of the structure. Integrated smart-glass also produces energy gained through sunlight that operates mobile phone charging stations littered across the square.
See more at: Archdaily
Zoom Info
Proposal for Casablanca Sustainable Market Square - Nikolova/Aarsø
This competition entry from a couple years ago is a brings together modern architectural thinking with classical Islamic traditions - creating a canopy structure that subtly re-imagines the star-and-polygon patterning of traditional Islamic buildings. The tree-like structures would protect from the harsh climate, while also working to collect rainwater that is collected in basins for use cleaning the market stalls at the end of the day. The canopy is also designed to become transparent at night; revealing the complex wood elements of the structure. Integrated smart-glass also produces energy gained through sunlight that operates mobile phone charging stations littered across the square.
See more at: Archdaily
Zoom Info
Proposal for Casablanca Sustainable Market Square - Nikolova/Aarsø
This competition entry from a couple years ago is a brings together modern architectural thinking with classical Islamic traditions - creating a canopy structure that subtly re-imagines the star-and-polygon patterning of traditional Islamic buildings. The tree-like structures would protect from the harsh climate, while also working to collect rainwater that is collected in basins for use cleaning the market stalls at the end of the day. The canopy is also designed to become transparent at night; revealing the complex wood elements of the structure. Integrated smart-glass also produces energy gained through sunlight that operates mobile phone charging stations littered across the square.
See more at: Archdaily
Zoom Info

Proposal for Casablanca Sustainable Market Square - Nikolova/Aarsø

This competition entry from a couple years ago is a brings together modern architectural thinking with classical Islamic traditions - creating a canopy structure that subtly re-imagines the star-and-polygon patterning of traditional Islamic buildings. The tree-like structures would protect from the harsh climate, while also working to collect rainwater that is collected in basins for use cleaning the market stalls at the end of the day. The canopy is also designed to become transparent at night; revealing the complex wood elements of the structure. Integrated smart-glass also produces energy gained through sunlight that operates mobile phone charging stations littered across the square.

See more at: Archdaily

Melt-Up furniture collection - Yasuhiro Suzuki
This collection of objects and furniture have been developed using a technique where polyester fibres are melted over frameworks and allowed to cool; producing works that juxtapose natural formations with artificial materials. Gaps in the resulting forms play with shadow as light passes through them, while some of the textures play with the idea of decay… so the pieces feel less like something from a factory and more like objects to be found in nature. 
See more at: DesignBoom
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Melt-Up furniture collection - Yasuhiro Suzuki
This collection of objects and furniture have been developed using a technique where polyester fibres are melted over frameworks and allowed to cool; producing works that juxtapose natural formations with artificial materials. Gaps in the resulting forms play with shadow as light passes through them, while some of the textures play with the idea of decay… so the pieces feel less like something from a factory and more like objects to be found in nature. 
See more at: DesignBoom
Zoom Info
Melt-Up furniture collection - Yasuhiro Suzuki
This collection of objects and furniture have been developed using a technique where polyester fibres are melted over frameworks and allowed to cool; producing works that juxtapose natural formations with artificial materials. Gaps in the resulting forms play with shadow as light passes through them, while some of the textures play with the idea of decay… so the pieces feel less like something from a factory and more like objects to be found in nature. 
See more at: DesignBoom
Zoom Info
Melt-Up furniture collection - Yasuhiro Suzuki
This collection of objects and furniture have been developed using a technique where polyester fibres are melted over frameworks and allowed to cool; producing works that juxtapose natural formations with artificial materials. Gaps in the resulting forms play with shadow as light passes through them, while some of the textures play with the idea of decay… so the pieces feel less like something from a factory and more like objects to be found in nature. 
See more at: DesignBoom
Zoom Info
Melt-Up furniture collection - Yasuhiro Suzuki
This collection of objects and furniture have been developed using a technique where polyester fibres are melted over frameworks and allowed to cool; producing works that juxtapose natural formations with artificial materials. Gaps in the resulting forms play with shadow as light passes through them, while some of the textures play with the idea of decay… so the pieces feel less like something from a factory and more like objects to be found in nature. 
See more at: DesignBoom
Zoom Info
Melt-Up furniture collection - Yasuhiro Suzuki
This collection of objects and furniture have been developed using a technique where polyester fibres are melted over frameworks and allowed to cool; producing works that juxtapose natural formations with artificial materials. Gaps in the resulting forms play with shadow as light passes through them, while some of the textures play with the idea of decay… so the pieces feel less like something from a factory and more like objects to be found in nature. 
See more at: DesignBoom
Zoom Info

Melt-Up furniture collection - Yasuhiro Suzuki

This collection of objects and furniture have been developed using a technique where polyester fibres are melted over frameworks and allowed to cool; producing works that juxtapose natural formations with artificial materials. Gaps in the resulting forms play with shadow as light passes through them, while some of the textures play with the idea of decay… so the pieces feel less like something from a factory and more like objects to be found in nature. 

See more at: DesignBoom

Amazing stainless steel fairy sculptures by Robin Wight
UK sculptor Robin Wight has produced a series of dramatic sculptures of fairies clutching dandelions. Several are on display at Trentham Gardens in Staffordshire, while others have been privately commissioned. They’re spectacular to say the least. 
Photos sourced from: This is Colossal 
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Amazing stainless steel fairy sculptures by Robin Wight
UK sculptor Robin Wight has produced a series of dramatic sculptures of fairies clutching dandelions. Several are on display at Trentham Gardens in Staffordshire, while others have been privately commissioned. They’re spectacular to say the least. 
Photos sourced from: This is Colossal 
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Amazing stainless steel fairy sculptures by Robin Wight
UK sculptor Robin Wight has produced a series of dramatic sculptures of fairies clutching dandelions. Several are on display at Trentham Gardens in Staffordshire, while others have been privately commissioned. They’re spectacular to say the least. 
Photos sourced from: This is Colossal 
Zoom Info
Amazing stainless steel fairy sculptures by Robin Wight
UK sculptor Robin Wight has produced a series of dramatic sculptures of fairies clutching dandelions. Several are on display at Trentham Gardens in Staffordshire, while others have been privately commissioned. They’re spectacular to say the least. 
Photos sourced from: This is Colossal 
Zoom Info
Amazing stainless steel fairy sculptures by Robin Wight
UK sculptor Robin Wight has produced a series of dramatic sculptures of fairies clutching dandelions. Several are on display at Trentham Gardens in Staffordshire, while others have been privately commissioned. They’re spectacular to say the least. 
Photos sourced from: This is Colossal 
Zoom Info
Amazing stainless steel fairy sculptures by Robin Wight
UK sculptor Robin Wight has produced a series of dramatic sculptures of fairies clutching dandelions. Several are on display at Trentham Gardens in Staffordshire, while others have been privately commissioned. They’re spectacular to say the least. 
Photos sourced from: This is Colossal 
Zoom Info

Amazing stainless steel fairy sculptures by Robin Wight

UK sculptor Robin Wight has produced a series of dramatic sculptures of fairies clutching dandelions. Several are on display at Trentham Gardens in Staffordshire, while others have been privately commissioned. They’re spectacular to say the least. 

Photos sourced from: This is Colossal